Wednesday, February 8, 2023
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GDOT officials are pre-treating the highway ahead of possible…

During winter weather, travel in North Georgia can be dangerous at times.

The potential for snow or ice is there as an arctic blast arrives overnight, and Georgia Department of Transportation officials continue their work to ensure the state’s highways are as safe as possible for those forced to stay on the road.

GDOT District Engineer Kelvin Mullins discussed preparations in Northeast Georgia’s 21 counties that make up District 1.

Mullins said GDOT determines which routes are considered first, but added that they all receive attention as needed.

We have some important routes that have been identified,” Mullins said. “The interstates are the priority, then we go on the state routes — you know, the 365, the 400, some of them, and then we prioritize the state routes. But we are now beating them all over the area. We are going to get all these roads done before the very cold temperatures hit. After that, when it gets cold, we will treat the bridges and wet areas with a salt mixture.”

Road salting involves applying a mixture of salt and water to roads and bridges to prevent them from freezing when temperatures drop dramatically. The brine technique started in Georgia after the 2014 Snow Magedon paralyzed travel in Atlanta.

“It made a big difference,” Mullins said. “It’s been something that we’ve only been doing for a couple of years and we’re in full swing right now and we’re continuing to grow and expand this operation and find different ways to work with other states to improve it, but it definitely helps to treat the roads before the events . More anxiety is not with this event, but if it rains heavily, it will wash everything away. We won’t have that with this event. But really, the problem is that after a heavy rain, the brine gets down on the road so that it doesn’t wash it away before it cools down.”

GDOT also now stores more of its treatment supplies at facilities throughout the area, making response times faster than a decade ago.

“We have salt in all of our salt barns around the area, strategically placed, which helps us get out faster,” Mullins said. “We still have one primary brine plant that is near the I-85/985 interchange. It is from there that most of the brine is taken. We will go there and fill it, but we have other places. It’s definitely good to have some of them in the region.”

Mullins offered advice for anyone planning to drive tonight – don’t do it unless it’s essential.

“It’s going to get really cold, probably after midnight or so last I saw. So be sure to stay off the roads if you can. And if you’re on the road and see our equipment, keep 100 feet away. Give us space, give us space, slow down and just be very careful. Be careful with black ice and such, but the best thing you can do is stay at home.”

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GDOT officials are pre-treating the highway ahead of possible…

During winter weather, travel in North Georgia can be dangerous at times.

The potential for snow or ice is there as an arctic blast arrives overnight, and Georgia Department of Transportation officials continue their work to ensure the state’s highways are as safe as possible for those forced to stay on the road.

GDOT District Engineer Kelvin Mullins discussed preparations in Northeast Georgia’s 21 counties that make up District 1.

Mullins said GDOT determines which routes are considered first, but added that they all receive attention as needed.

We have some important routes that have been identified,” Mullins said. “The interstates are the priority, then we go on the state routes — you know, the 365, the 400, some of them, and then we prioritize the state routes. But we are now beating them all over the area. We are going to get all these roads done before the very cold temperatures hit. After that, when it gets cold, we will treat the bridges and wet areas with a salt mixture.”

Road salting involves applying a mixture of salt and water to roads and bridges to prevent them from freezing when temperatures drop dramatically. The brine technique started in Georgia after the 2014 Snow Magedon paralyzed travel in Atlanta.

“It made a big difference,” Mullins said. “It’s been something that we’ve only been doing for a couple of years and we’re in full swing right now and we’re continuing to grow and expand this operation and find different ways to work with other states to improve it, but it definitely helps to treat the roads before the events . More anxiety is not with this event, but if it rains heavily, it will wash everything away. We won’t have that with this event. But really, the problem is that after a heavy rain, the brine gets down on the road so that it doesn’t wash it away before it cools down.”

GDOT also now stores more of its treatment supplies at facilities throughout the area, making response times faster than a decade ago.

“We have salt in all of our salt barns around the area, strategically placed, which helps us get out faster,” Mullins said. “We still have one primary brine plant that is near the I-85/985 interchange. It is from there that most of the brine is taken. We will go there and fill it, but we have other places. It’s definitely good to have some of them in the region.”

Mullins offered advice for anyone planning to drive tonight – don’t do it unless it’s essential.

“It’s going to get really cold, probably after midnight or so last I saw. So be sure to stay off the roads if you can. And if you’re on the road and see our equipment, keep 100 feet away. Give us space, give us space, slow down and just be very careful. Be careful with black ice and such, but the best thing you can do is stay at home.”

Reported by Source link

RELATED ARTICLES
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Most Popular