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Getting closer to tradition: German market Christkindl is becoming a holiday destination in Atlanta

The Christkindl Market in Atlanta is getting closer to achieving the goal that has motivated volunteers and organizers since 2016: to become a permanent part of the city that supports the spread German languages ​​and cultures in the southeastern United States

Traditional German The Christmas fair started with 12 wooden stalls Atlantic station six years ago, but has since quintupled, rebounding last year after the pandemic to regain momentum in its sixth year running.

The goals, the organizers say, have always been multifaceted. First, the urban German community wanted to invite their adoptive parents to get a taste of their country for the holidays.

But the leaders had a different motive German-American Cultural Foundationor GAC-F, from the ground up: Make enough money from the event to make it an annual fundraiser to support German-language and cultural programs at Goethe Center and beyond.

“The market works two ways: it is a vital fundraiser for the GAC Foundation to support our charities, students, friends and community partners, but at the same time it is also designed to create new cultural experiences and enrich the lives of our visitors. and the entire southeast,” he said Yosip Tamasevichchairman of GAC-F and senior vice president in charge of procurement at AGCO Corp.

Becoming a real fundraiser seems more attainable than ever as the Christkindl market wraps up this week leading up to Christmas.

This year, all 60 stands were occupied sellers selling food, gluvain, sweet meat, empanadas, pretzels, roasted nuts and other dishes of local and international cuisine, as well as toys, sweets and more. Kate Wohlfarth, a large German jewelry retailer, retained its large rectangular marquee at the north end. And merchandise vendors offered alpaca wool, olive wood cutting boards, CBD oil, Indonesian crafts, among other items.

New additions this year included an expanded live music schedule and the installation of a 40-foot Christmas tree that became a focal point for visitors (and their a selfie). Photos with Santa were also a hit, with families booking spots to bring their children.

Although the market has had to endure cold and wet weather, it has made some Germans living in Atlanta feel right at home, adding to the authenticity that visiting relatives are sometimes surprised to find here.

“We are very pleased and grateful for how the market has evolved to where we are today,” Mr. Tomasewicz told Global Atlanta in an email. “This is only possible because of a very dedicated core team and many volunteers who put in most of their free time and put their heart and soul into it. This year’s market was aimed at making it more attractive and even more famous.’

The market has started to see a lot of repeat traffic based on social media chatter and other metrics, indicating that it is slowly becoming a bona fide tradition in the city.

This is the second year in a row that GAC-F has led the parking market Buckhead Village district, high-end commercial development Jamestown properties. (There is a company based in Atlanta and Cologne, Germany, and supported by German investors.)

Mr Tomaszewicz said the location was “close to perfect” and that Jamestown was a refreshing partner to support where the market landed after an early odyssey around the city. But he didn’t have time to call Buckhead Village a permanent home for the market.

“We are currently in negotiations to keep the market in this location for another year. However, we are also exploring other locations. In other words, it’s too early to say,” said Mr. Tomashevich.

This year, the alcohol sale directly benefits GAC-F, as a $5 souvenir mug is required to purchase the gluvaine, with proceeds going directly to the foundation. The same goes for the $5 wristbands that allow you to purchase beer and other alcoholic beverages. Entry to the market, meanwhile, remains free.

Mr. Tomashevich hopes that families from across the Southeast will wander among the cabins, creating memories similar to those that stayed with him from his childhood.

“The best Christmas memory from my childhood is the whole atmosphere of the fair, the smell of roasted almonds and hot chocolate, Christmas carols and, of course, Santa’s appearance. We try to repeat this to give young and old children these beautiful moments,” he said.

Most important, however, are the connections that are made when people gather at the market and share ideas and embrace their shared humanity, he said.

“I want it to be a place for reflection from the busyness of everyday life and for it to enrich the lives of market visitors,” he added.

Need a last minute Christmas gift or a new place to stay in the lead up to Christmas? On Saturday, December 24, the market is open until 9 p.m. Learn more and plan your visit here.

Reported by Source link

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Getting closer to tradition: German market Christkindl is becoming a holiday destination in Atlanta

The Christkindl Market in Atlanta is getting closer to achieving the goal that has motivated volunteers and organizers since 2016: to become a permanent part of the city that supports the spread German languages ​​and cultures in the southeastern United States

Traditional German The Christmas fair started with 12 wooden stalls Atlantic station six years ago, but has since quintupled, rebounding last year after the pandemic to regain momentum in its sixth year running.

The goals, the organizers say, have always been multifaceted. First, the urban German community wanted to invite their adoptive parents to get a taste of their country for the holidays.

But the leaders had a different motive German-American Cultural Foundationor GAC-F, from the ground up: Make enough money from the event to make it an annual fundraiser to support German-language and cultural programs at Goethe Center and beyond.

“The market works two ways: it is a vital fundraiser for the GAC Foundation to support our charities, students, friends and community partners, but at the same time it is also designed to create new cultural experiences and enrich the lives of our visitors. and the entire southeast,” he said Yosip Tamasevichchairman of GAC-F and senior vice president in charge of procurement at AGCO Corp.

Becoming a real fundraiser seems more attainable than ever as the Christkindl market wraps up this week leading up to Christmas.

This year, all 60 stands were occupied sellers selling food, gluvain, sweet meat, empanadas, pretzels, roasted nuts and other dishes of local and international cuisine, as well as toys, sweets and more. Kate Wohlfarth, a large German jewelry retailer, retained its large rectangular marquee at the north end. And merchandise vendors offered alpaca wool, olive wood cutting boards, CBD oil, Indonesian crafts, among other items.

New additions this year included an expanded live music schedule and the installation of a 40-foot Christmas tree that became a focal point for visitors (and their a selfie). Photos with Santa were also a hit, with families booking spots to bring their children.

Although the market has had to endure cold and wet weather, it has made some Germans living in Atlanta feel right at home, adding to the authenticity that visiting relatives are sometimes surprised to find here.

“We are very pleased and grateful for how the market has evolved to where we are today,” Mr. Tomasewicz told Global Atlanta in an email. “This is only possible because of a very dedicated core team and many volunteers who put in most of their free time and put their heart and soul into it. This year’s market was aimed at making it more attractive and even more famous.’

The market has started to see a lot of repeat traffic based on social media chatter and other metrics, indicating that it is slowly becoming a bona fide tradition in the city.

This is the second year in a row that GAC-F has led the parking market Buckhead Village district, high-end commercial development Jamestown properties. (There is a company based in Atlanta and Cologne, Germany, and supported by German investors.)

Mr Tomaszewicz said the location was “close to perfect” and that Jamestown was a refreshing partner to support where the market landed after an early odyssey around the city. But he didn’t have time to call Buckhead Village a permanent home for the market.

“We are currently in negotiations to keep the market in this location for another year. However, we are also exploring other locations. In other words, it’s too early to say,” said Mr. Tomashevich.

This year, the alcohol sale directly benefits GAC-F, as a $5 souvenir mug is required to purchase the gluvaine, with proceeds going directly to the foundation. The same goes for the $5 wristbands that allow you to purchase beer and other alcoholic beverages. Entry to the market, meanwhile, remains free.

Mr. Tomashevich hopes that families from across the Southeast will wander among the cabins, creating memories similar to those that stayed with him from his childhood.

“The best Christmas memory from my childhood is the whole atmosphere of the fair, the smell of roasted almonds and hot chocolate, Christmas carols and, of course, Santa’s appearance. We try to repeat this to give young and old children these beautiful moments,” he said.

Most important, however, are the connections that are made when people gather at the market and share ideas and embrace their shared humanity, he said.

“I want it to be a place for reflection from the busyness of everyday life and for it to enrich the lives of market visitors,” he added.

Need a last minute Christmas gift or a new place to stay in the lead up to Christmas? On Saturday, December 24, the market is open until 9 p.m. Learn more and plan your visit here.

Reported by Source link

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