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How Russia uses sarcasm as a weapon in the Ukrainian crisis

MOSCOW “Wars in Europe rarely start on Wednesday.”

That’s how a top Russian diplomat brushed aside speculation in the West that Russia could invade neighboring Ukraine as soon as Wednesday, February 16th.

As the United States and other NATO members warn of the possibility of a devastating war, Russia is resisting sarcasm rather than bombs or olive branches.

It is a tool that officials in Moscow have long used to humiliate their rivals and divert attention from actions that are seen as threatening the West or Russia’s neighbors. Concise jokes are combined with the Kremlin’s internal agenda, forcing Russia and its almighty president to look cooler and smarter than the countries of the panicked democratic West.

Due to the fact that Wednesday may be the day when President Vladimir Putin will begin the invasion of Ukraine. Russian officials ridiculed them.

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In a Facebook post, Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova asked “disinformation media” in the West to “announce the schedule of our” invasions “for next year. I would like to plan my vacation. “

“Unfortunately for many Western media, the war failed to start again,” Zakharova said at a briefing on Wednesday. “Fighting has erupted in their pages, but they have nothing to do with reality.”

Meanwhile, Ukrainians have been living for weeks with signs of a possible invasion, with about 150,000 Russian troops surrounding most of their country for military exercises. This week, Russia said it was starting to withdraw some troops, however Western military officials say there is no evidence of a serious conclusion.

Russia’s ambassador to the European Union, Vladimir Chizhov, has accused Westerners of “slandering” for allegedly invading. In an interview with the German daily Welt, he insisted that “there will be no attack this Wednesday.”

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Then Chizhov added: “Wars in Europe rarely start on Wednesday.”

The statement looked more frivolous than historically significant. World War I began on Tuesday and World War II began in Europe on Friday, but the history of Europe’s war over the centuries includes conflicts that began within a week.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov also readily accepted the growing fears of the West. Asked on Wednesday whether the Russian presidential administration had acted differently at night, he told reporters that everyone slept peacefully and resumed work as usual in the morning.

“Western hysteria is still far from culminating,” Peskov said. “We need to be patient, because remission will not come soon.”

The master of Russian diplomatic equipment is Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. He has been known around the world for his jokes, which are often spoken in English, for more than 18 years as the Kremlin’s top diplomat.

On Wednesday, Lavrov mocked the West, which unfortunately “has no basic upbringing” for trying to dictate or predict Russia’s plans.

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Under sarcasm, Russia has spoken from the beginning about the current Ukrainian crisis: first by moving troops towards Ukraine, then periodically restraining the possibility of a diplomatic solution, keeping foreign officials and world markets at a permanent border.

While Putin has offered more talks this week, his intentions in Ukraine remain unclear. Western intelligence suggests that some kind of invasion could still happen – next Wednesday or any day of the week.

___

Follow the coverage of Russian-Ukrainian tensions in the AP on https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or distributed without permission.

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How Russia uses sarcasm as a weapon in the Ukrainian crisis

MOSCOW “Wars in Europe rarely start on Wednesday.”

That’s how a top Russian diplomat brushed aside speculation in the West that Russia could invade neighboring Ukraine as soon as Wednesday, February 16th.

As the United States and other NATO members warn of the possibility of a devastating war, Russia is resisting sarcasm rather than bombs or olive branches.

It is a tool that officials in Moscow have long used to humiliate their rivals and divert attention from actions that are seen as threatening the West or Russia’s neighbors. Concise jokes are combined with the Kremlin’s internal agenda, forcing Russia and its almighty president to look cooler and smarter than the countries of the panicked democratic West.

Due to the fact that Wednesday may be the day when President Vladimir Putin will begin the invasion of Ukraine. Russian officials ridiculed them.

Advertising

In a Facebook post, Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova asked “disinformation media” in the West to “announce the schedule of our” invasions “for next year. I would like to plan my vacation. “

“Unfortunately for many Western media, the war failed to start again,” Zakharova said at a briefing on Wednesday. “Fighting has erupted in their pages, but they have nothing to do with reality.”

Meanwhile, Ukrainians have been living for weeks with signs of a possible invasion, with about 150,000 Russian troops surrounding most of their country for military exercises. This week, Russia said it was starting to withdraw some troops, however Western military officials say there is no evidence of a serious conclusion.

Russia’s ambassador to the European Union, Vladimir Chizhov, has accused Westerners of “slandering” for allegedly invading. In an interview with the German daily Welt, he insisted that “there will be no attack this Wednesday.”

Advertising

Then Chizhov added: “Wars in Europe rarely start on Wednesday.”

The statement looked more frivolous than historically significant. World War I began on Tuesday and World War II began in Europe on Friday, but the history of Europe’s war over the centuries includes conflicts that began within a week.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov also readily accepted the growing fears of the West. Asked on Wednesday whether the Russian presidential administration had acted differently at night, he told reporters that everyone slept peacefully and resumed work as usual in the morning.

“Western hysteria is still far from culminating,” Peskov said. “We need to be patient, because remission will not come soon.”

The master of Russian diplomatic equipment is Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. He has been known around the world for his jokes, which are often spoken in English, for more than 18 years as the Kremlin’s top diplomat.

On Wednesday, Lavrov mocked the West, which unfortunately “has no basic upbringing” for trying to dictate or predict Russia’s plans.

Advertising

Under sarcasm, Russia has spoken from the beginning about the current Ukrainian crisis: first by moving troops towards Ukraine, then periodically restraining the possibility of a diplomatic solution, keeping foreign officials and world markets at a permanent border.

While Putin has offered more talks this week, his intentions in Ukraine remain unclear. Western intelligence suggests that some kind of invasion could still happen – next Wednesday or any day of the week.

___

Follow the coverage of Russian-Ukrainian tensions in the AP on https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or distributed without permission.

Reported by Source link

RELATED ARTICLES
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Most Popular