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Analysis: Donald Trump says he will run for president again

OPINION AND COMMENTARY

Opinion’s editorials and other content offer perspectives on issues important to our community and are independent of the work of our newsroom reporters.

If you watched The Donald Trump Show on Tuesday night, you’d be forgiven for thinking the holiday reruns had arrived a little early.

Trump announced his candidacy for republican candidates in 2024. It’s very early, given that we’re still counting votes from last week’s midterm elections. Didn’t we get a nice little break before the next season?

And yet this episode was repeated, even memorable.

Trump laid out a the best case for his return to the White House than he seemed capable of recently. He listed the successes of his administration and detailed the two years of Joe Biden’s presidency.

“Everything [the Biden administration] it was necessary to sit back and watch, he said. “There’s never been anything that can compete with what we’ve done.”

He painted a picture of a strong US rebounding from the coronavirus pandemic and gaining respect on the international stage. He even managed to refrain from making it all about himself for a while.

“This is the task of a politician or a conditional candidate. This is a challenge for a great movement that embodies the courage, confidence and spirit of the American people,” he said. “It’s a movement. It’s not for any man.”

He added uncharacteristically, “It’s not going to be my campaign. This will be our companyAll together.”

In the end, he sounded pretty bad, like an aging rock band that thinks it has to play every track on a greatest hits collection to get the applause it so craves.

If Trump has a chance, he should run like this: emphasizing pain and frustration with inflation, crime and immigration, without dwelling on his grievances about the 2020 election or the personal shenanigans he sees on all sides.

Trump spoke for more than an hour from his Mar-a-Lago resort in South Florida, standing in front of a ridiculous number of American flags and addressing a small but energetic audience, many of whom wore a sharp mix of business suits and cheap red MAGA hats.

US-NEWS-TRUMP-GET.JPG
Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Florida, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2022. Trump pulled the trigger on his third choice for the White House on Tuesday. (Alon Skuy/AFP/Getty Images/TNS) ALON SKUY/AFP TNS

The former president tried to take credit for himself Republican victory in the US House of Representatives, arguing that others were aiming too high in search of a “red wave.” The strange argument is that the party had to trim its sails in the midterms

But what else could he say? What does he have in store for Trump-supporting losers like Dr. Mehmet Oz of Pennsylvania, who couldn’t defeat a Democrat who is clearly suffering from a lingering stroke? How does he explain Blake Masters and Curry Lake losing in Arizona even though other Republicans were riding there?

Gov. Greg Abbott drew praise for allegedly praising Trump for his success in winning the Latino vote in border counties. But this Abbott and other Texas Republicans does heavy outreach and political organizing. Trump is incapable of creating parties.

For the first half hour, Trump uncharacteristically seemed to stick mostly to the script. There was no long tangent about the “stolen” elections of 2020. There were no caustic shots opponents like Ron DeSantis. He picked up on Biden’s mental and verbal faults, but it was never really obnoxious. He fumbled, especially at the end, with long digressions on topics from Germany to the FBI, but nothing like his rallying speeches, which mired in incoherence.

The Trump of Part 1, before it turned into Wacky Rally Trump, may be unbeatable in the GOP primary. But as he demonstrated, he is not capable of such discipline for two hours, let alone two years.

He will not be able to focus on the agenda or movement. It will invariably be about Trump and whatever grievances he perceives or whatever credit he thinks he deserves.

Also, Trump hasn’t really addressed his last responsibility: spreading the sense that he is in the Republican Party chief responsible for lost races that could be won.

This is the biggest obstacle he faces. And so far he has no answer. Announcing that he’s running so early is a clear sign of weakness — he’s trying to intimidate his rivals and possibly stave off a federal indictment on his handling of presidential documents and who knows what other charges.

With few other options, Trump plays the hits. He wants GOP voters to ignore the back-to-back episodes — losses in 2018, 2020 and 2022.

The question is whether viewers really prefer to watch something they haven’t seen before.

Similar stories from the Macon Telegraph

Ryan J. Rusak, opinion editor of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. He grew up in Benbrook and is a graduate of TCU. He spent more than 15 years as a political journalist, covering four presidential elections and several sessions of the Texas Legislature. He lives in East Fort Worth.



Reported by Source link

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Analysis: Donald Trump says he will run for president again

OPINION AND COMMENTARY

Opinion’s editorials and other content offer perspectives on issues important to our community and are independent of the work of our newsroom reporters.

If you watched The Donald Trump Show on Tuesday night, you’d be forgiven for thinking the holiday reruns had arrived a little early.

Trump announced his candidacy for republican candidates in 2024. It’s very early, given that we’re still counting votes from last week’s midterm elections. Didn’t we get a nice little break before the next season?

And yet this episode was repeated, even memorable.

Trump laid out a the best case for his return to the White House than he seemed capable of recently. He listed the successes of his administration and detailed the two years of Joe Biden’s presidency.

“Everything [the Biden administration] it was necessary to sit back and watch, he said. “There’s never been anything that can compete with what we’ve done.”

He painted a picture of a strong US rebounding from the coronavirus pandemic and gaining respect on the international stage. He even managed to refrain from making it all about himself for a while.

“This is the task of a politician or a conditional candidate. This is a challenge for a great movement that embodies the courage, confidence and spirit of the American people,” he said. “It’s a movement. It’s not for any man.”

He added uncharacteristically, “It’s not going to be my campaign. This will be our companyAll together.”

In the end, he sounded pretty bad, like an aging rock band that thinks it has to play every track on a greatest hits collection to get the applause it so craves.

If Trump has a chance, he should run like this: emphasizing pain and frustration with inflation, crime and immigration, without dwelling on his grievances about the 2020 election or the personal shenanigans he sees on all sides.

Trump spoke for more than an hour from his Mar-a-Lago resort in South Florida, standing in front of a ridiculous number of American flags and addressing a small but energetic audience, many of whom wore a sharp mix of business suits and cheap red MAGA hats.

US-NEWS-TRUMP-GET.JPG
Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Florida, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2022. Trump pulled the trigger on his third choice for the White House on Tuesday. (Alon Skuy/AFP/Getty Images/TNS) ALON SKUY/AFP TNS

The former president tried to take credit for himself Republican victory in the US House of Representatives, arguing that others were aiming too high in search of a “red wave.” The strange argument is that the party had to trim its sails in the midterms

But what else could he say? What does he have in store for Trump-supporting losers like Dr. Mehmet Oz of Pennsylvania, who couldn’t defeat a Democrat who is clearly suffering from a lingering stroke? How does he explain Blake Masters and Curry Lake losing in Arizona even though other Republicans were riding there?

Gov. Greg Abbott drew praise for allegedly praising Trump for his success in winning the Latino vote in border counties. But this Abbott and other Texas Republicans does heavy outreach and political organizing. Trump is incapable of creating parties.

For the first half hour, Trump uncharacteristically seemed to stick mostly to the script. There was no long tangent about the “stolen” elections of 2020. There were no caustic shots opponents like Ron DeSantis. He picked up on Biden’s mental and verbal faults, but it was never really obnoxious. He fumbled, especially at the end, with long digressions on topics from Germany to the FBI, but nothing like his rallying speeches, which mired in incoherence.

The Trump of Part 1, before it turned into Wacky Rally Trump, may be unbeatable in the GOP primary. But as he demonstrated, he is not capable of such discipline for two hours, let alone two years.

He will not be able to focus on the agenda or movement. It will invariably be about Trump and whatever grievances he perceives or whatever credit he thinks he deserves.

Also, Trump hasn’t really addressed his last responsibility: spreading the sense that he is in the Republican Party chief responsible for lost races that could be won.

This is the biggest obstacle he faces. And so far he has no answer. Announcing that he’s running so early is a clear sign of weakness — he’s trying to intimidate his rivals and possibly stave off a federal indictment on his handling of presidential documents and who knows what other charges.

With few other options, Trump plays the hits. He wants GOP voters to ignore the back-to-back episodes — losses in 2018, 2020 and 2022.

The question is whether viewers really prefer to watch something they haven’t seen before.

Similar stories from the Macon Telegraph

Ryan J. Rusak, opinion editor of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. He grew up in Benbrook and is a graduate of TCU. He spent more than 15 years as a political journalist, covering four presidential elections and several sessions of the Texas Legislature. He lives in East Fort Worth.



Reported by Source link

RELATED ARTICLES
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Most Popular