Monday, November 28, 2022
HomeGeorgia & USAAt Gwinnett R&D Hub Siemens presents EV charging platform as "gas station...

At Gwinnett R&D Hub Siemens presents EV charging platform as “gas station of the future”

It used to be CuriosityLaba three-mile stand-alone test site for cars Peachtree Corners a magnet for international companies piloting the latest mobility technologies, was not Siemens.

The German the industrial giant operated several factories and offices north of Atlanta at least ten years before the city was incorporated in 2012.

Siemens now employs more than 2,000 people in the subway area, with 500 people at the Peachtree Corners research and development center, which on January 1 was named home to the eMobility business unit created to help the corporate hippopotamus act as a smart startup. this sector that is moving fast.

Stephen Sidwell praised Siemens for moving faster as a startup than an industrial giant. Photo: Siemens

The initiative paid off on Thursday when Siemens, which recorded global revenue of $ 74.4 billion last year, unveiled a weather-resistant charging structure developed and patented in collaboration with Canadian launch of building materials Nexii in just six months.

In a speech at the ceremony of the “first charge” in the parking lot of Siemens CEO Nexii Stephen Sidwell said many large corporations are moving at “turtle speed,” but Siemens has kept up with Nexii’s “super-fast” pace.

“They were moving as fast as we are,” he said.

Mr Sidwell added that Nexiite’s company’s material, a patented blend of sand and other elements, is designed to replace concrete and steel, materials that represent much higher “embodied” CO2 emissions from their carbon-intensive production processes.

“If concrete was a country, it would be number 3. It’s China, the United States and concrete,” said Mr. Sidwell, who likes the idea of ​​tackling two big carbon emissions at once: transport and buildings.

And it’s not just the composition of canopies that lowers carbon; the overhead design is hollowed out to accommodate wires and busbar systems used to transmit power to multiple chargers. This means that installers only need to dig one small space to connect to the main power supply, instead of burying wires in trenches that need to be backfilled with even more concrete.

The VersiCharge XL solution can be used in new or existing buildings, especially in garages, office spaces and other places where large EV groups will use Level 2 and Level 3 chargers. The road map of the future includes last-mile delivery fleets and even stadiums. The structure is also expanding, with batteries and solar panels as important additions planned later.

“Think of it almost as a gas station of the future,” Mr. Sidwell said.

Although this project appeared quickly, Siemens is not a newcomer to the EV space, John Debour, This was stated in an interview with Global Atlanta head of Siemens eMobility for North America.

With about a century of innovation in power generation, Siemens began producing EVs in 2010, when the U.S. was a “land of 10,000 pilots” and heavily dependent on tax breaks.

Now charging technology is moving faster to become more open and standardized – a position that Siemens has long lobbied to prevent consumers from “tied assets”.

“It was really interesting for us that we never stopped, and it was actually here,” Mr Debour said of Peachtree Corners. “All the way from 2010 to 2020 we did three different charging generations. It was like we just sat there, waiting and waiting, which was sometimes disappointing, but we were ready to go. ”

Electric cars, however, finally seem ready to get their moment. In 2020, sales of electric cars more than doubled to 9.1 percent of the global car market.

“I may be an optimist, but it seems the industry is really starting to reach the next pace and scale,” Mr Debour said.

This optimism is based in part on infrastructure law Congress adopted last August, which allocates $ 7.5 billion to build a nationwide charging network. According to this plan, Georgia will receive $ 20 million this year and $ 135 million over the next five years, a spokesman said. Carolyn Bordeauxa Democrat from Gwyneth who advertised her role in insisting on a bipartisan spending plan.

The congresswoman spoke about the need for government cooperation with private sector innovators, whose technological know-how will be needed to rapidly scale electrification to achieve aggressive climate targets by 2030 and improve equitable access to the EV space.

“I like to say that Georgia can do good by doing good,” said Ms. Bordeaux, noting that job creation and the fight against climate change can go hand in hand.

Siemens is one of the few companies that has capabilities in this whole “puzzle,” from car-connected chargers to the inevitable load on the entire network, which will eventually lead to thousands of cars connected to them simultaneously. Its extensive product portfolio includes low-voltage distribution, utilities, monitoring software and even energy storage – the key to widespread solar and wind energy – through FluenceSiemens helped launch its IPO that has just grossed nearly $ 1 billion in revenue Ruth Grazkepresident of Siemens Smart Infrastructure US and CEO Siemens Industry Inc.

“All of these parts and the parts we’ve been working on for a very long time are now becoming one whole, and it’s an exciting part,” Ms. Grazke told Global Atlanta.

Such reliability will be vital if Georgia is to do its utmost to become a world leader in the EV value chain, Georgia’s civil service commissioner said. Tim Ecols said in his speech, praising Germany as a key partner in security technology that changes the game for the state.

“We need more German equipment – no less,” he said. So far, the state’s progress includes $ 2.6 billion SC battery the plant and its suppliers, and the promised $ 5 billion Rivian electric pickup factory.

The fact that Rivian is going to build trucks will be key to inspiring Georgians – especially Republicans like himself – to join the EV revolution, Mr Ecols said.

“If there’s one thing Republicans love, it’s a truck – a truck that can get ahead of the Corvette, which has real all-wheel drive, will go through three feet of water, and it can charge your home like a generator – that’s what I am,” he said. the laughter of the crowd.

CuriosityLab also plays a role in the implementation of new technologies. The Peachtree Corners city initiative has attracted innovators from places like Germany, Israel and more to test their products and get data from a living smart city.

Mayor of Peachtree Corners Mike Mason caused moans from the crowd when he mentioned work on a Siemens competitor in the past. But he quickly recovered when he noted that he now has a Siemens charger in his garage for the Nissan Leaf, and noted the fact that the company had been at Peachtree Corners longer than him.

Siemens / Nexii partners who came up with the idea during the board session pose with Ruth Grantske

Reported by Source link

RELATED ARTICLES
- Advertisment -

Most Popular

At Gwinnett R&D Hub Siemens presents EV charging platform as “gas station of the future”

It used to be CuriosityLaba three-mile stand-alone test site for cars Peachtree Corners a magnet for international companies piloting the latest mobility technologies, was not Siemens.

The German the industrial giant operated several factories and offices north of Atlanta at least ten years before the city was incorporated in 2012.

Siemens now employs more than 2,000 people in the subway area, with 500 people at the Peachtree Corners research and development center, which on January 1 was named home to the eMobility business unit created to help the corporate hippopotamus act as a smart startup. this sector that is moving fast.

Stephen Sidwell praised Siemens for moving faster as a startup than an industrial giant. Photo: Siemens

The initiative paid off on Thursday when Siemens, which recorded global revenue of $ 74.4 billion last year, unveiled a weather-resistant charging structure developed and patented in collaboration with Canadian launch of building materials Nexii in just six months.

In a speech at the ceremony of the “first charge” in the parking lot of Siemens CEO Nexii Stephen Sidwell said many large corporations are moving at “turtle speed,” but Siemens has kept up with Nexii’s “super-fast” pace.

“They were moving as fast as we are,” he said.

Mr Sidwell added that Nexiite’s company’s material, a patented blend of sand and other elements, is designed to replace concrete and steel, materials that represent much higher “embodied” CO2 emissions from their carbon-intensive production processes.

“If concrete was a country, it would be number 3. It’s China, the United States and concrete,” said Mr. Sidwell, who likes the idea of ​​tackling two big carbon emissions at once: transport and buildings.

And it’s not just the composition of canopies that lowers carbon; the overhead design is hollowed out to accommodate wires and busbar systems used to transmit power to multiple chargers. This means that installers only need to dig one small space to connect to the main power supply, instead of burying wires in trenches that need to be backfilled with even more concrete.

The VersiCharge XL solution can be used in new or existing buildings, especially in garages, office spaces and other places where large EV groups will use Level 2 and Level 3 chargers. The road map of the future includes last-mile delivery fleets and even stadiums. The structure is also expanding, with batteries and solar panels as important additions planned later.

“Think of it almost as a gas station of the future,” Mr. Sidwell said.

Although this project appeared quickly, Siemens is not a newcomer to the EV space, John Debour, This was stated in an interview with Global Atlanta head of Siemens eMobility for North America.

With about a century of innovation in power generation, Siemens began producing EVs in 2010, when the U.S. was a “land of 10,000 pilots” and heavily dependent on tax breaks.

Now charging technology is moving faster to become more open and standardized – a position that Siemens has long lobbied to prevent consumers from “tied assets”.

“It was really interesting for us that we never stopped, and it was actually here,” Mr Debour said of Peachtree Corners. “All the way from 2010 to 2020 we did three different charging generations. It was like we just sat there, waiting and waiting, which was sometimes disappointing, but we were ready to go. ”

Electric cars, however, finally seem ready to get their moment. In 2020, sales of electric cars more than doubled to 9.1 percent of the global car market.

“I may be an optimist, but it seems the industry is really starting to reach the next pace and scale,” Mr Debour said.

This optimism is based in part on infrastructure law Congress adopted last August, which allocates $ 7.5 billion to build a nationwide charging network. According to this plan, Georgia will receive $ 20 million this year and $ 135 million over the next five years, a spokesman said. Carolyn Bordeauxa Democrat from Gwyneth who advertised her role in insisting on a bipartisan spending plan.

The congresswoman spoke about the need for government cooperation with private sector innovators, whose technological know-how will be needed to rapidly scale electrification to achieve aggressive climate targets by 2030 and improve equitable access to the EV space.

“I like to say that Georgia can do good by doing good,” said Ms. Bordeaux, noting that job creation and the fight against climate change can go hand in hand.

Siemens is one of the few companies that has capabilities in this whole “puzzle,” from car-connected chargers to the inevitable load on the entire network, which will eventually lead to thousands of cars connected to them simultaneously. Its extensive product portfolio includes low-voltage distribution, utilities, monitoring software and even energy storage – the key to widespread solar and wind energy – through FluenceSiemens helped launch its IPO that has just grossed nearly $ 1 billion in revenue Ruth Grazkepresident of Siemens Smart Infrastructure US and CEO Siemens Industry Inc.

“All of these parts and the parts we’ve been working on for a very long time are now becoming one whole, and it’s an exciting part,” Ms. Grazke told Global Atlanta.

Such reliability will be vital if Georgia is to do its utmost to become a world leader in the EV value chain, Georgia’s civil service commissioner said. Tim Ecols said in his speech, praising Germany as a key partner in security technology that changes the game for the state.

“We need more German equipment – no less,” he said. So far, the state’s progress includes $ 2.6 billion SC battery the plant and its suppliers, and the promised $ 5 billion Rivian electric pickup factory.

The fact that Rivian is going to build trucks will be key to inspiring Georgians – especially Republicans like himself – to join the EV revolution, Mr Ecols said.

“If there’s one thing Republicans love, it’s a truck – a truck that can get ahead of the Corvette, which has real all-wheel drive, will go through three feet of water, and it can charge your home like a generator – that’s what I am,” he said. the laughter of the crowd.

CuriosityLab also plays a role in the implementation of new technologies. The Peachtree Corners city initiative has attracted innovators from places like Germany, Israel and more to test their products and get data from a living smart city.

Mayor of Peachtree Corners Mike Mason caused moans from the crowd when he mentioned work on a Siemens competitor in the past. But he quickly recovered when he noted that he now has a Siemens charger in his garage for the Nissan Leaf, and noted the fact that the company had been at Peachtree Corners longer than him.

Siemens / Nexii partners who came up with the idea during the board session pose with Ruth Grantske

Reported by Source link

RELATED ARTICLES
- Advertisment -

Most Popular