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Dog Safety on Holidays: Tips and Tricks for Pet Parents

December means eating, drinking and being merry with friends and family. But nothing can ruin the holiday spirit like an emergency visit to the vet. These advice can help prevent a holiday disaster for both you and your pup.

Keep human food away from puppies

  • Make sure your dog does not have access to treats, especially those containing chocolate, xylitol, turkey and turkey skin, grapes/raisins, onions, or other toxic foods.
  • Sharing table scraps should be avoided, especially during holidays, as the food is usually very rich and fatty, which is difficult to digest.

Decorations

  • Protect your tree! A curious puppy may knock it over or knock it over.
  • Be careful with additives in your Christmas tree water that can be dangerous to dogs (we recommend avoiding all additives to be as safe as possible!)
  • Place decorations, tinsel and electrical cords out of reach.
  • Never leave your dog alone in a place with a lit candle!
  • Keep holiday plants – especially holly, mistletoe and lilies – away.
  • Turn off the decorations when you are not around.

Organizing a small meeting?

  • Dogs who are not normally shy can be nervous when visited – make sure you provide access to a comfortable, quiet place to hide.
  • Watch Exits – Even if your puppies are comfortable around guests, keep a close eye on them, especially when people are entering or leaving your home.
  • Make sure your puppy has proper identification with your current contact information, including a microchip with current, registered information.
  • Take out the trash so your puppies can’t get to it, especially if it has food scraps or bones in it.

Holiday trip

  • Interstate and international travel regulations require any dog ​​you bring with you to have a certificate of health from a veterinarian – even if you’re traveling by car.
  • Puppies in vehicles should always be securely fastened with a secure harness or carrier and placed in an area where there are no airbags.
  • Dogs should never be left alone in a car – in any weather.
  • If you are traveling by plane and plan to take your puppy with you, check with your vet first. Air travel can endanger some puppies, especially dogs with short noses.
  • In addition to your dog’s food and medication, be sure to pack copies of his dog’s medical records, information to help identify your pup if he gets lost, first aid supplies, and other important items.
  • Dog boarding while traveling? Talk to your vet to learn how to best protect your puppy from canine flu and other contagious diseases, and to make sure your puppy is up to date with vaccines.

Plan ahead

  • Always keep the phone number for your veterinarian, 24-hour emergency clinic, and poison control in an easy-to-find location.
  • Quick action can save a life! If you think your puppy has been poisoned or has eaten something they shouldn’t, call your vet or your local emergency room right away. Signs of distress include sudden changes in behavior, pain, vomiting, or diarrhea.

About the Author: Dr. Jim McLean, Scenthound’s Chief Veterinarian

Dr. McLean’s first job was as a nursing assistant when he was 15 years old. Since then, he has worked in all aspects of small animal veterinary hospitals, practiced small animal medicine and surgery for 26 years, and owned and founded multi-physician veterinary hospitals. Jim received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from Virginia Tech University (VMRCVM) in 1994 and his Master of Business Administration from Georgetown University in 2011.

Coming full circle, he joined the Scenthound pack to bring his experience and knowledge to the grooming world. As Chief Veterinarian, Dr. McLean guides Scenthound from a health and medicine perspective and helps achieve our mission to improve the overall health of pets on a larger scale.

About Scenthound

Fragrant is a membership-based dog grooming business that allows dog parents to ensure their furry friends receive the routine grooming they need. Pet parents can choose the membership plan that works best for their dog and add extras as needed. The brand takes its name from its unique approach to dog care, focusing on five key areas of routine and preventative dog care, including Srelative Soats, EArs, Nsick, and Teeth. Use our Scent dog locator to find the nearest center to you!

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Dog Safety on Holidays: Tips and Tricks for Pet Parents

December means eating, drinking and being merry with friends and family. But nothing can ruin the holiday spirit like an emergency visit to the vet. These advice can help prevent a holiday disaster for both you and your pup.

Keep human food away from puppies

  • Make sure your dog does not have access to treats, especially those containing chocolate, xylitol, turkey and turkey skin, grapes/raisins, onions, or other toxic foods.
  • Sharing table scraps should be avoided, especially during holidays, as the food is usually very rich and fatty, which is difficult to digest.

Decorations

  • Protect your tree! A curious puppy may knock it over or knock it over.
  • Be careful with additives in your Christmas tree water that can be dangerous to dogs (we recommend avoiding all additives to be as safe as possible!)
  • Place decorations, tinsel and electrical cords out of reach.
  • Never leave your dog alone in a place with a lit candle!
  • Keep holiday plants – especially holly, mistletoe and lilies – away.
  • Turn off the decorations when you are not around.

Organizing a small meeting?

  • Dogs who are not normally shy can be nervous when visited – make sure you provide access to a comfortable, quiet place to hide.
  • Watch Exits – Even if your puppies are comfortable around guests, keep a close eye on them, especially when people are entering or leaving your home.
  • Make sure your puppy has proper identification with your current contact information, including a microchip with current, registered information.
  • Take out the trash so your puppies can’t get to it, especially if it has food scraps or bones in it.

Holiday trip

  • Interstate and international travel regulations require any dog ​​you bring with you to have a certificate of health from a veterinarian – even if you’re traveling by car.
  • Puppies in vehicles should always be securely fastened with a secure harness or carrier and placed in an area where there are no airbags.
  • Dogs should never be left alone in a car – in any weather.
  • If you are traveling by plane and plan to take your puppy with you, check with your vet first. Air travel can endanger some puppies, especially dogs with short noses.
  • In addition to your dog’s food and medication, be sure to pack copies of his dog’s medical records, information to help identify your pup if he gets lost, first aid supplies, and other important items.
  • Dog boarding while traveling? Talk to your vet to learn how to best protect your puppy from canine flu and other contagious diseases, and to make sure your puppy is up to date with vaccines.

Plan ahead

  • Always keep the phone number for your veterinarian, 24-hour emergency clinic, and poison control in an easy-to-find location.
  • Quick action can save a life! If you think your puppy has been poisoned or has eaten something they shouldn’t, call your vet or your local emergency room right away. Signs of distress include sudden changes in behavior, pain, vomiting, or diarrhea.

About the Author: Dr. Jim McLean, Scenthound’s Chief Veterinarian

Dr. McLean’s first job was as a nursing assistant when he was 15 years old. Since then, he has worked in all aspects of small animal veterinary hospitals, practiced small animal medicine and surgery for 26 years, and owned and founded multi-physician veterinary hospitals. Jim received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from Virginia Tech University (VMRCVM) in 1994 and his Master of Business Administration from Georgetown University in 2011.

Coming full circle, he joined the Scenthound pack to bring his experience and knowledge to the grooming world. As Chief Veterinarian, Dr. McLean guides Scenthound from a health and medicine perspective and helps achieve our mission to improve the overall health of pets on a larger scale.

About Scenthound

Fragrant is a membership-based dog grooming business that allows dog parents to ensure their furry friends receive the routine grooming they need. Pet parents can choose the membership plan that works best for their dog and add extras as needed. The brand takes its name from its unique approach to dog care, focusing on five key areas of routine and preventative dog care, including Srelative Soats, EArs, Nsick, and Teeth. Use our Scent dog locator to find the nearest center to you!

Reported by Source link

RELATED ARTICLES
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Most Popular