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“Euphoria”: Minka Kelly in the adult publication “Friday Lights”

SPOILER: Don’t read if you haven’t watched Season 2 ”Euphoria”On HBO.

Laila Gariti, a tumultuous, spoiled country princess from “Friday Lights” Minka Kelly, loved football fighters and promoted them on the field, but that’s where the superficial resemblance between Layla and Maddie Perez (Alex Demi) from “Euphoria” – the last teenage queen bee on television – ends. Gariti was an angel made of cotton candy compared to Perez’s sour and intelligent demeanor. However, under the appearance and joyful pursuits hide two young women who spend a lot of time busy trying to figure themselves out.

Kelly, who plays proxy and boss Maddie in a guest role in “Euphoria,” is happy to give up high ponytails and will now play the eldest and wisest. “I like to be a little more down to earth in the character I play – I don’t feel a nervous breakdown every episode, ha, so that’s a good change of pace!”

Kelly, a self-proclaimed Euphoria fan even before she was personally invited by the showrunner Sam Levinson to join the cast of Season 2, was stunned when he told her that he had written the character – Samantha – with her in mind.

“It was a big leap of faith because I didn’t talk to him until our first day on set. But I’m such a fan of Sam’s writing and storytelling that I knew that everything he wrote would be great because he doesn’t do anything half-hearted or mediocre, ”Kelly said. She knew little of who Samantha would be for Maddie, and perhaps Levinson didn’t know either. However, once he saw the chemistry between Kelly and Demi on screen, he decided to save Samantha’s character not just for episode 2.

In the 6th series of “Euphoria” entitled “A Thousand Little Blood Trees” Samantha during a night voyage tells Maddie some difficult truths about friendship, love and compassion for herself and others.

Kelly talked to Variety about why she finds it necessary to show the dynamics on television, for example, between Maddie and Samantha, what a return to teenage drama is and what parts of “Euphoria” make the show so … euphoric for her.

FRIDAY NIGHT, Minka Kelly, The Pilot, 2006-2011, photo: Paul Drinkwater / © NBC / Courtesy: Everett Collection.
Provided by the NBC / Everett Collection

How was your relationship with “Euphoria”, as a fan at first, and now as an actor in the cast?

I’m so much older than anyone that I would never have thought I’d get a role in “Euphoria”. Being a guest of an already running show on any set is a really tricky thing, especially if it’s a show you know and love because the last thing you want to do is break in and something goes wrong. You don’t want everyone to regret that you were there, so you have to throw out of your head that this is one of your favorite shows when you’re on set. Otherwise, you look around in disbelief and are distracted by the fact that you are there – you need, like everyone else, grab the bottles and get to work.

alexa-demie-minka-kelly

Tell me about your character, Samantha, and what makes her special with Maddie.

I only had one paragraph of dialogue when I first “met” Samantha, so I really didn’t know who she would be for Maddie – all I knew was that she was a wealthy mother whom Maddie nursed. I believed it would probably be more than what was on that one page because we are dealing with Sam. So I was only supposed to be in the first episode of Season 2, but then after working together Sam brought me back and then found out he wanted me to be with Maddie for a minute or two, which went a little deeper.

Samantha is essentially the older, wiser version of Maddie. I’m here to hug her arm and let her know she’s only 17 and it’s time to make mistakes and not look at people older than myself and compare myself to anyone else. Because at first glance it seems like I’m just a successful woman and that I’m happily married, but in reality Samantha’s life hasn’t always been perfect. She has also gone through what Maddie is going through, in a sense, so she is there to give her hope that she can have a healthy, non-toxic functioning relationship when she gets older with herself, with friends and partners.

Why do you think it is important to show female friendships and acquaintances, especially positive images?

I was excited because I personally owe it to all the older women in my life who taught me by example or conversation – or just challenged me to my shit and told me how wrong I was or how I needed to be a little less harsh on myself. I feel that all I know is the ability of women to take care of each other and take care of each other and back each other. And that doesn’t mean I also don’t know the dynamics of competition with other women. I am happy to see that this new conversation is happening around women and how we need to fix each other’s crowns. I love seeing more of this on television and in movies these days because I think we all grew out of the tolerance of women’s confrontation against women in our media.

“Friday Lights” has become your popularity. How does it go back to teenage drama?

It’s nice because it feels like as an adult character, Samantha can apply everything she’s learned and pass it on to Maddie, and hopes an ounce of it will fit into her when it comes to forgiveness and forgiveness to herself or for what she gave imagine resting and not wanting to rush through this part of your life.

Lazily loaded image

Minka Kelly played Buddy’s daughter Garity Lyle, who most of the time in the show was wrapped in a love triangle with Jason Street and Tim Riggins.
Provided by NBC

A lot of talk about “Euphoria” is not only about the script and not even about the plot – it’s about aesthetics, and costumes, and the cameraman.

When it first came out, I was so impressed with the story and how “Euphoria” touches on topics that are very taboo and that in adolescence float on fragile waters, and young people stumble and smash their faces before finding their way. I loved “Children” in my youth, and “Thirteen” is my favorite movie so far. I think it’s an important story, and besides, it’s also one of the most aesthetically pleasing shows I’ve ever seen. From costumes to makeup to the plays of all the actors and directors – from top to bottom, it’s such a stimulus for the senses at once.

You also participate in HBO Max’s Titans – have you experienced professional support from the network?

It was really such a dream because there is such freedom for narrators to tell their stories. Even working on a show like Titans is a superhero show, but they’re not afraid to delve deeper and fight addiction and sexual addiction and pedophilia – lack of fear when it comes to darkness – that’s what draws me to and excites me in my work.

And, hey, also nice to get back to work [on “Euphoria”], and no need to wear a wig, haha. But working with HBO and Sam Levinson is very enjoyable because the process is so collaborative. “Euphoria” is malleable, and if he throws you an idea and she doesn’t like you, he’ll throw it away. It creates such a safe space that you feel comfortable expressing your own ideas or saying you don’t like something. I think part of what makes “Euphoria” so adorable is that everyone has at least a part in telling the stories of their characters, and that’s what makes great performances, because everyone feels real in the story we we tell.

This interview has been edited and collapsed.



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“Euphoria”: Minka Kelly in the adult publication “Friday Lights”

SPOILER: Don’t read if you haven’t watched Season 2 ”Euphoria”On HBO.

Laila Gariti, a tumultuous, spoiled country princess from “Friday Lights” Minka Kelly, loved football fighters and promoted them on the field, but that’s where the superficial resemblance between Layla and Maddie Perez (Alex Demi) from “Euphoria” – the last teenage queen bee on television – ends. Gariti was an angel made of cotton candy compared to Perez’s sour and intelligent demeanor. However, under the appearance and joyful pursuits hide two young women who spend a lot of time busy trying to figure themselves out.

Kelly, who plays proxy and boss Maddie in a guest role in “Euphoria,” is happy to give up high ponytails and will now play the eldest and wisest. “I like to be a little more down to earth in the character I play – I don’t feel a nervous breakdown every episode, ha, so that’s a good change of pace!”

Kelly, a self-proclaimed Euphoria fan even before she was personally invited by the showrunner Sam Levinson to join the cast of Season 2, was stunned when he told her that he had written the character – Samantha – with her in mind.

“It was a big leap of faith because I didn’t talk to him until our first day on set. But I’m such a fan of Sam’s writing and storytelling that I knew that everything he wrote would be great because he doesn’t do anything half-hearted or mediocre, ”Kelly said. She knew little of who Samantha would be for Maddie, and perhaps Levinson didn’t know either. However, once he saw the chemistry between Kelly and Demi on screen, he decided to save Samantha’s character not just for episode 2.

In the 6th series of “Euphoria” entitled “A Thousand Little Blood Trees” Samantha during a night voyage tells Maddie some difficult truths about friendship, love and compassion for herself and others.

Kelly talked to Variety about why she finds it necessary to show the dynamics on television, for example, between Maddie and Samantha, what a return to teenage drama is and what parts of “Euphoria” make the show so … euphoric for her.

FRIDAY NIGHT, Minka Kelly, The Pilot, 2006-2011, photo: Paul Drinkwater / © NBC / Courtesy: Everett Collection.
Provided by the NBC / Everett Collection

How was your relationship with “Euphoria”, as a fan at first, and now as an actor in the cast?

I’m so much older than anyone that I would never have thought I’d get a role in “Euphoria”. Being a guest of an already running show on any set is a really tricky thing, especially if it’s a show you know and love because the last thing you want to do is break in and something goes wrong. You don’t want everyone to regret that you were there, so you have to throw out of your head that this is one of your favorite shows when you’re on set. Otherwise, you look around in disbelief and are distracted by the fact that you are there – you need, like everyone else, grab the bottles and get to work.

alexa-demie-minka-kelly

Tell me about your character, Samantha, and what makes her special with Maddie.

I only had one paragraph of dialogue when I first “met” Samantha, so I really didn’t know who she would be for Maddie – all I knew was that she was a wealthy mother whom Maddie nursed. I believed it would probably be more than what was on that one page because we are dealing with Sam. So I was only supposed to be in the first episode of Season 2, but then after working together Sam brought me back and then found out he wanted me to be with Maddie for a minute or two, which went a little deeper.

Samantha is essentially the older, wiser version of Maddie. I’m here to hug her arm and let her know she’s only 17 and it’s time to make mistakes and not look at people older than myself and compare myself to anyone else. Because at first glance it seems like I’m just a successful woman and that I’m happily married, but in reality Samantha’s life hasn’t always been perfect. She has also gone through what Maddie is going through, in a sense, so she is there to give her hope that she can have a healthy, non-toxic functioning relationship when she gets older with herself, with friends and partners.

Why do you think it is important to show female friendships and acquaintances, especially positive images?

I was excited because I personally owe it to all the older women in my life who taught me by example or conversation – or just challenged me to my shit and told me how wrong I was or how I needed to be a little less harsh on myself. I feel that all I know is the ability of women to take care of each other and take care of each other and back each other. And that doesn’t mean I also don’t know the dynamics of competition with other women. I am happy to see that this new conversation is happening around women and how we need to fix each other’s crowns. I love seeing more of this on television and in movies these days because I think we all grew out of the tolerance of women’s confrontation against women in our media.

“Friday Lights” has become your popularity. How does it go back to teenage drama?

It’s nice because it feels like as an adult character, Samantha can apply everything she’s learned and pass it on to Maddie, and hopes an ounce of it will fit into her when it comes to forgiveness and forgiveness to herself or for what she gave imagine resting and not wanting to rush through this part of your life.

Lazily loaded image

Minka Kelly played Buddy’s daughter Garity Lyle, who most of the time in the show was wrapped in a love triangle with Jason Street and Tim Riggins.
Provided by NBC

A lot of talk about “Euphoria” is not only about the script and not even about the plot – it’s about aesthetics, and costumes, and the cameraman.

When it first came out, I was so impressed with the story and how “Euphoria” touches on topics that are very taboo and that in adolescence float on fragile waters, and young people stumble and smash their faces before finding their way. I loved “Children” in my youth, and “Thirteen” is my favorite movie so far. I think it’s an important story, and besides, it’s also one of the most aesthetically pleasing shows I’ve ever seen. From costumes to makeup to the plays of all the actors and directors – from top to bottom, it’s such a stimulus for the senses at once.

You also participate in HBO Max’s Titans – have you experienced professional support from the network?

It was really such a dream because there is such freedom for narrators to tell their stories. Even working on a show like Titans is a superhero show, but they’re not afraid to delve deeper and fight addiction and sexual addiction and pedophilia – lack of fear when it comes to darkness – that’s what draws me to and excites me in my work.

And, hey, also nice to get back to work [on “Euphoria”], and no need to wear a wig, haha. But working with HBO and Sam Levinson is very enjoyable because the process is so collaborative. “Euphoria” is malleable, and if he throws you an idea and she doesn’t like you, he’ll throw it away. It creates such a safe space that you feel comfortable expressing your own ideas or saying you don’t like something. I think part of what makes “Euphoria” so adorable is that everyone has at least a part in telling the stories of their characters, and that’s what makes great performances, because everyone feels real in the story we we tell.

This interview has been edited and collapsed.



Reported by Source link

RELATED ARTICLES
- Advertisment -

Most Popular