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Explainer: What awaits Biden’s Supreme Court candidate

Washington (AP) – President Joe Biden nomination of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson the Supreme Court has embarked on what Democrats hope is a quick, bipartisan process of confirming the first black women in court.

Jackson will replace Judge Stephen Breyer, who said he will retire this summer at the end of the current court hearing. But Democrats want to confirm Jackson a few months or weeks before, making sure she is a waiter, in case the 50-on-50 balance in the Senate changes in any way. Democrats control the Senate because Vice President Kamala Harris has a casting vote.

Setting deadlines ahead, Democrats await confirmation by Judge Amy Connie Barrett in 2020 as a new standard. While the other nominees took several months, Barrett was confirmed just over five weeks after the death of Judge Ruth Bader Ginzburg, just before the presidential election of the same year. Jackson’s confirmation is likely to take longer, but Senate Judicial Committee Chairman Dick Durbin said Friday that the group will begin the process “immediately.”

The last three confirmations by the Supreme Court, of all the candidates elected by then-President Donald Trump, were intense guerrilla struggles that deeply divided the Senate. Democrats say they want to bring down the temperature and confirm Jackson with the votes of both Republicans and Democrats. But it is unclear whether they will be able to do so.

Announcing Jackson’s nomination on Friday, Biden noted that in recent weeks he had met with Durbin and the chief Republican in the Judicial Board, Iowa Senator Chuck Grasley. “I hope they move quickly,” Biden said. “And I know they will move fairly.”

Look at Jackson’s nomination and the next steps in the Senate:

WHO IS KETANJI BROWN JACKSON?

Jackson was nominated by President Biden in 2021 to serve on the District of Columbia Court of Appeals and confirmed by the Senate last June. She previously sat in the District of Columbia County Court, nominated by former President Barack Obama and confirmed in 2013. She worked as a legal clerk at Breyer early in her career and served on the U.S. Sentencing Commission, an agency that develops federal sentencing policy.

Accepting the nomination on Friday, Jackson said she hopes her life, career and love for the country and the Constitution “will inspire future generations of Americans.”

WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT?

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said Friday that the Senate will move forward on the nomination through a “fair, timely and speedy process.”

Once the White House officially submits Jackson’s candidacy to Capitol Hill, the Judicial Committee’s next step will be to send her an extensive questionnaire and request documents to begin the vetting. Meanwhile, Jackson will begin arranging meetings with any senators who wish to meet with her for private conversations before the public hearing. She is expected to start touring Capitol Hill next week.

The next few weeks senators will hold a reading on Jackson’s past, career and, most importantly, her decisions and opinions as a federal judge.

Her confirmation hearings, which are expected to last about four days, could begin as early as mid-March.

WHEN CAN IT BE CONFIRMED?

Democrats have an unofficial goal to approve Jackson by April 8, when the Senate is due to leave Washington for a two-week spring break.

It may be a lot, but Biden facilitated the process by choosing Jackson, who was already screened by the Senate Judiciary Committee last year when Biden nominated her for her current position. Sumer said that after the judiciary votes in favor of the candidacy, the Senate will immediately proceed to confirm it.

Several factors can still delay action. Democrats are waiting for the return of New Mexico Senator Ben Ray Luhan, who suffered a stroke a few weeks ago. expected back in the Senate next month. Without Luhan, Democrats do not have the required 50 votes in the Senate, and they will have to depend on Republican support.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine could also complicate the schedule, as the US response will be taken by the Senate and the White House in the coming weeks. Jackson herself referred to the conflict abroad, thanking Biden on Friday for “the care you have taken to fulfill your constitutional duty in the service of our democracy with everything that is happening in the world today.”

HOW DID THE REPUBLICANS REACT?

A majority of Republicans in the Senate are expected to oppose the nomination, and their first statements were skeptical. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has questioned Jackson’s performance as an appeals judge, others have questioned her reputation for crime and her political affiliations.

But because Jackson, replacing Breer, will not change the ideological balance of the court, and because Republicans have confirmed three conservative judges under Trump, Republican senators may not spend much political energy to oppose it. As the midterm elections approach, Republicans want to focus on issues such as inflation and education, which they say are doing political harm to Democrats.

Dew looms as a potential flashpoint. Several Republican senators said Biden had absurdly promised during his presidential campaign that he would nominate a black woman. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz said it was discrimination and “insult” to black women. Mississippi Sen. Roger Wicker has said he views Biden’s promise as a “positive action” for the Supreme Court.

But McConnell has made it clear that he does not want such criticism to continue. Speaking this week in Kentucky, he dismissed allegations that Biden’s promise was inappropriate, noting that Trump himself had promised to sue the woman before Barrett was nominated.

“I guarantee that she will be respectfully reviewed in a process that I think you can be proud of,” McConnell said on Tuesday. On Friday, he said he was looking forward to meeting with Jackson.

DO DEMOCRATS NEED REPUBLICAN VOTES?

As long as Luhan returns as a result of the final vote, and the rest of the Democratic group remains healthy and present in Washington, Democrats can confirm Jackson without Republican support. Vice President Harris can break a draw.

However, Biden and Durbin said they wanted the vote to be bipartisan. Biden invited several Republican senators to the White House as he weighed his choices, and Durbin maintained close ties with several key Republicans, including Grasley and Susan Collins, moderate Maine officials.

Republicans Collins, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina last year voted to confirm Jackson in federal appeals court. While Collins seemed ready to vote for her again, it is unclear whether Murkowski, who will be re-elected this year, or Graham, who insisted on another candidate, will support her.

Graham, who voted for several candidates for Biden’s courts, pushed the president to nominate federal judge J. Michelle Childs, a South Carolina resident. Earlier this month, he said his vote would have been “very problematic” if Childs had not been a candidate, and expressed disappointment after the announcement from the White House on Friday.

WHY IS JACKSON’S NOMINATION HISTORICAL?

Jackson will be the first black female judge in more than 200 years of court existence.

Of the 115 judges who served, only five were women, starting with Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981. One of the five, Judge Sonia Sotomayor, is Latin American. Everyone else was white – O’Connor, Connie Barrett, Ginzburg and Elena Kagan.

Clarence Thomas and the late Turgud Marshall are the only two black men to have served on the court.

“For too long our government, our courts have not been like America,” Biden said Friday.

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Explainer: What awaits Biden’s Supreme Court candidate

Washington (AP) – President Joe Biden nomination of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson the Supreme Court has embarked on what Democrats hope is a quick, bipartisan process of confirming the first black women in court.

Jackson will replace Judge Stephen Breyer, who said he will retire this summer at the end of the current court hearing. But Democrats want to confirm Jackson a few months or weeks before, making sure she is a waiter, in case the 50-on-50 balance in the Senate changes in any way. Democrats control the Senate because Vice President Kamala Harris has a casting vote.

Setting deadlines ahead, Democrats await confirmation by Judge Amy Connie Barrett in 2020 as a new standard. While the other nominees took several months, Barrett was confirmed just over five weeks after the death of Judge Ruth Bader Ginzburg, just before the presidential election of the same year. Jackson’s confirmation is likely to take longer, but Senate Judicial Committee Chairman Dick Durbin said Friday that the group will begin the process “immediately.”

The last three confirmations by the Supreme Court, of all the candidates elected by then-President Donald Trump, were intense guerrilla struggles that deeply divided the Senate. Democrats say they want to bring down the temperature and confirm Jackson with the votes of both Republicans and Democrats. But it is unclear whether they will be able to do so.

Announcing Jackson’s nomination on Friday, Biden noted that in recent weeks he had met with Durbin and the chief Republican in the Judicial Board, Iowa Senator Chuck Grasley. “I hope they move quickly,” Biden said. “And I know they will move fairly.”

Look at Jackson’s nomination and the next steps in the Senate:

WHO IS KETANJI BROWN JACKSON?

Jackson was nominated by President Biden in 2021 to serve on the District of Columbia Court of Appeals and confirmed by the Senate last June. She previously sat in the District of Columbia County Court, nominated by former President Barack Obama and confirmed in 2013. She worked as a legal clerk at Breyer early in her career and served on the U.S. Sentencing Commission, an agency that develops federal sentencing policy.

Accepting the nomination on Friday, Jackson said she hopes her life, career and love for the country and the Constitution “will inspire future generations of Americans.”

WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT?

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said Friday that the Senate will move forward on the nomination through a “fair, timely and speedy process.”

Once the White House officially submits Jackson’s candidacy to Capitol Hill, the Judicial Committee’s next step will be to send her an extensive questionnaire and request documents to begin the vetting. Meanwhile, Jackson will begin arranging meetings with any senators who wish to meet with her for private conversations before the public hearing. She is expected to start touring Capitol Hill next week.

The next few weeks senators will hold a reading on Jackson’s past, career and, most importantly, her decisions and opinions as a federal judge.

Her confirmation hearings, which are expected to last about four days, could begin as early as mid-March.

WHEN CAN IT BE CONFIRMED?

Democrats have an unofficial goal to approve Jackson by April 8, when the Senate is due to leave Washington for a two-week spring break.

It may be a lot, but Biden facilitated the process by choosing Jackson, who was already screened by the Senate Judiciary Committee last year when Biden nominated her for her current position. Sumer said that after the judiciary votes in favor of the candidacy, the Senate will immediately proceed to confirm it.

Several factors can still delay action. Democrats are waiting for the return of New Mexico Senator Ben Ray Luhan, who suffered a stroke a few weeks ago. expected back in the Senate next month. Without Luhan, Democrats do not have the required 50 votes in the Senate, and they will have to depend on Republican support.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine could also complicate the schedule, as the US response will be taken by the Senate and the White House in the coming weeks. Jackson herself referred to the conflict abroad, thanking Biden on Friday for “the care you have taken to fulfill your constitutional duty in the service of our democracy with everything that is happening in the world today.”

HOW DID THE REPUBLICANS REACT?

A majority of Republicans in the Senate are expected to oppose the nomination, and their first statements were skeptical. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has questioned Jackson’s performance as an appeals judge, others have questioned her reputation for crime and her political affiliations.

But because Jackson, replacing Breer, will not change the ideological balance of the court, and because Republicans have confirmed three conservative judges under Trump, Republican senators may not spend much political energy to oppose it. As the midterm elections approach, Republicans want to focus on issues such as inflation and education, which they say are doing political harm to Democrats.

Dew looms as a potential flashpoint. Several Republican senators said Biden had absurdly promised during his presidential campaign that he would nominate a black woman. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz said it was discrimination and “insult” to black women. Mississippi Sen. Roger Wicker has said he views Biden’s promise as a “positive action” for the Supreme Court.

But McConnell has made it clear that he does not want such criticism to continue. Speaking this week in Kentucky, he dismissed allegations that Biden’s promise was inappropriate, noting that Trump himself had promised to sue the woman before Barrett was nominated.

“I guarantee that she will be respectfully reviewed in a process that I think you can be proud of,” McConnell said on Tuesday. On Friday, he said he was looking forward to meeting with Jackson.

DO DEMOCRATS NEED REPUBLICAN VOTES?

As long as Luhan returns as a result of the final vote, and the rest of the Democratic group remains healthy and present in Washington, Democrats can confirm Jackson without Republican support. Vice President Harris can break a draw.

However, Biden and Durbin said they wanted the vote to be bipartisan. Biden invited several Republican senators to the White House as he weighed his choices, and Durbin maintained close ties with several key Republicans, including Grasley and Susan Collins, moderate Maine officials.

Republicans Collins, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina last year voted to confirm Jackson in federal appeals court. While Collins seemed ready to vote for her again, it is unclear whether Murkowski, who will be re-elected this year, or Graham, who insisted on another candidate, will support her.

Graham, who voted for several candidates for Biden’s courts, pushed the president to nominate federal judge J. Michelle Childs, a South Carolina resident. Earlier this month, he said his vote would have been “very problematic” if Childs had not been a candidate, and expressed disappointment after the announcement from the White House on Friday.

WHY IS JACKSON’S NOMINATION HISTORICAL?

Jackson will be the first black female judge in more than 200 years of court existence.

Of the 115 judges who served, only five were women, starting with Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981. One of the five, Judge Sonia Sotomayor, is Latin American. Everyone else was white – O’Connor, Connie Barrett, Ginzburg and Elena Kagan.

Clarence Thomas and the late Turgud Marshall are the only two black men to have served on the court.

“For too long our government, our courts have not been like America,” Biden said Friday.

Reported by Source link

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