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Life in a construction area, part fifty sec

If this event has not yet beautified your area, wait. It goes. I’m old enough to remember that if six – no, do it seven, there must be a foreman – the Irish with picks and shovels could prepare an empty house to build a house. After all, how “progress” changed this operation.

For more than four years the small house, originally built in 1927 for workers of the now defunct railroad, which ended where the PDC is now located, has been empty, with the exception of a number of homeless squatters. Last year, the site was demolished – of course, in the current mode, where very little was saved, and a 50,000-pound wheel loader cleaned the area from edge to edge.

And then he sat, miserably empty and apparently devoid of life, except for a number of happy rodents and a growing collection of local weeds.

Ah, these were the days of peace and quiet that were destroyed one morning with the arrival of the first of a series of heavy machinery, all too wide for the tiny – 140 X 45 feet – space.

Bulldozers, wheel loaders, cranes, cranes, dump trucks, cement trucks – they were there. The Irishman (my race) is not visible. What could they do with all this equipment? A neighbor who monitors city affairs told me that it is now allowed to build underground plots, such as street parking. Impressive!

Then, after another long period of inactivity, a crane arrived to deliver two small Bobcat-like cars. We won’t see them again until the crane returns to lift them out of the 18-foot pit, where we assumed the house would eventually be erected. Wait – there’s more.

A few days before the faucet reappeared, we noticed water boiling from the sidewalk across the road from our house. Called 911 and was told we were number two to let them know. A couple of hours later, a crew from the Beverly Hills Water Division appeared and inspected the situation.

Until nightfall, they worked, removing the sidewalk and soil, until they reached the damaged water supply. Yeah. The water pipe cracked. Laid down in 1933 – it was the year of my birth and apparently I was in better shape than the trumpets. During the following days the trench was widened, our water was cut off several times. One neighbor soon discovered that the line to his home from the main line had been broken and would be needed. expensive repairs – worth $ 20,000, at least we were told.

Next came the private plumbers, who went deep into the existing trench and dug another parallel hole and, when she left, covered both trenches with steel plates for a day.

Here the story becomes a novel.

Down the street, a construction company happily loaded dump trucks for a final push on the site. The last truck of the day rumbled along with a heavy load of rocks and soil, and as he drove over a second steel plate over a water trench, the plate overturned, hitting the underside of the truck, opening the transmission body and bringing the vehicle stopped, one wheel stuck, one wheel stuck .

At the same time, a crane drove up for the action on the street and wanted to pull out the Bobcats. At that time, a whole group of residents was at the scene, watching and thinking what might happen next.

This morning (Saturday) private plumbers and BH water appeared and went into the trench to do something. I recently saw them four men staring into the trench – no activity. But they widened the trench a little more.

If the city ever reads this little drama, I hope they will make some notes about our ancient infrastructure and the real challenges of running a small town with all its big problems. Follow the news for the next issue of Life in the Construction Zone.



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Life in a construction area, part fifty sec

If this event has not yet beautified your area, wait. It goes. I’m old enough to remember that if six – no, do it seven, there must be a foreman – the Irish with picks and shovels could prepare an empty house to build a house. After all, how “progress” changed this operation.

For more than four years the small house, originally built in 1927 for workers of the now defunct railroad, which ended where the PDC is now located, has been empty, with the exception of a number of homeless squatters. Last year, the site was demolished – of course, in the current mode, where very little was saved, and a 50,000-pound wheel loader cleaned the area from edge to edge.

And then he sat, miserably empty and apparently devoid of life, except for a number of happy rodents and a growing collection of local weeds.

Ah, these were the days of peace and quiet that were destroyed one morning with the arrival of the first of a series of heavy machinery, all too wide for the tiny – 140 X 45 feet – space.

Bulldozers, wheel loaders, cranes, cranes, dump trucks, cement trucks – they were there. The Irishman (my race) is not visible. What could they do with all this equipment? A neighbor who monitors city affairs told me that it is now allowed to build underground plots, such as street parking. Impressive!

Then, after another long period of inactivity, a crane arrived to deliver two small Bobcat-like cars. We won’t see them again until the crane returns to lift them out of the 18-foot pit, where we assumed the house would eventually be erected. Wait – there’s more.

A few days before the faucet reappeared, we noticed water boiling from the sidewalk across the road from our house. Called 911 and was told we were number two to let them know. A couple of hours later, a crew from the Beverly Hills Water Division appeared and inspected the situation.

Until nightfall, they worked, removing the sidewalk and soil, until they reached the damaged water supply. Yeah. The water pipe cracked. Laid down in 1933 – it was the year of my birth and apparently I was in better shape than the trumpets. During the following days the trench was widened, our water was cut off several times. One neighbor soon discovered that the line to his home from the main line had been broken and would be needed. expensive repairs – worth $ 20,000, at least we were told.

Next came the private plumbers, who went deep into the existing trench and dug another parallel hole and, when she left, covered both trenches with steel plates for a day.

Here the story becomes a novel.

Down the street, a construction company happily loaded dump trucks for a final push on the site. The last truck of the day rumbled along with a heavy load of rocks and soil, and as he drove over a second steel plate over a water trench, the plate overturned, hitting the underside of the truck, opening the transmission body and bringing the vehicle stopped, one wheel stuck, one wheel stuck .

At the same time, a crane drove up for the action on the street and wanted to pull out the Bobcats. At that time, a whole group of residents was at the scene, watching and thinking what might happen next.

This morning (Saturday) private plumbers and BH water appeared and went into the trench to do something. I recently saw them four men staring into the trench – no activity. But they widened the trench a little more.

If the city ever reads this little drama, I hope they will make some notes about our ancient infrastructure and the real challenges of running a small town with all its big problems. Follow the news for the next issue of Life in the Construction Zone.



Reported by Source link

RELATED ARTICLES
- Advertisment -

Most Popular