Sunday, October 2, 2022
HomeTechnologyNew Coal Phase-Out Study Fuels Doubts About 'Commissioner'

New Coal Phase-Out Study Fuels Doubts About ‘Commissioner’

Ulrich von Lampe, Mercator Research Institute for Global Mining and Climate Change (MCC) gGmbH

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain

A new research approach that analyzes political discourse through an automated evaluation of the text of comments on the social media platform Twitter now sheds light on a fundamental question of climate policy: does it promote social peace when government solves complex issues in a round table with all relevant stakeholders? A striking example of such a policy is the German Coal Commission 2018/19. The findings are sobering, according to a study conducted by the Berlin Institute for Climate Research MCC (Merctor Research Institute for Global Assets and Climate Change), and published by Energy policy.


Regarding the commission that developed the German, opinions were divided hard coal phased out no later than 2038 and allocated billions of euros to help affected regions. For some, a committee of business experts trade unionspolicy, civil society and academia, was ideal for conflict resolution; others grumbled about “commission” as a substitute for leadership and good communication.

“Traditionally, you gauge the course of public opinion through repeated polls,” says Finn Muller-Hansen, a researcher with MCC’s Applied Sustainability Science working group and lead author of the study. “But it’s expensive and time-consuming – thanks to modern big data techniques, Twitter analysis with its immediate and accurate results is also informative.”

For their study, the research team looked at all German-language Twitter communication in the temporal context of the Coal Commission. They filtered out 558,000 German-language tweets and comments embedded in retweets related to the coal phase-out and 1.8 million tweets and retweets about the climate crisis in general as a baseline for comparison. The comments were then evaluated based on three criteria: first, how positive or negative the respective short message was written, second, what role certain keywords played in it, and third, how the tweets were distributed within the Twitter community.

“The result shows that public discourse on Twitter after the end of the coal commission was even more controversial and generally more negative than before it began,” reports MCC researcher Müller-Hansen. “These trends are more pronounced in statements about phasing out coal than in climate statements from Gen. , suggesting a strong connection with the work of the coal commission.”

The study listed 35 key words, of which, after the completion of the commission’s work, most of the positive ones began to be used less often, and the negative ones – more often. And in terms of retweets, the study reveals increasing modularity, with people talking more closely in their own bubble at the end than at the beginning, even as the Coal Commission sought to bring together different social subgroups and promote cohesion.

“Certainly, the approximately eight million Twitter users in Germany are not fully representative of society, and automated analysis is still a young field of research with potential for further improvement,” explains Jan Minks, head of the MCC working group and co-author of the study.

“Nonetheless, this type of research provides valuable information for policymakers: here it shows how this form of decision-making affects mood in a country — and, more generally, big data analysis of social media can be used to measure mood in different issues of energy, transport, heat, agricultural transition practically in real time.”


Coal Exit Legitimation Strategies in Germany and Canada


Additional information:
Finn Muller-Hansen et al. The German Coal Twitter Debate: Reacting to the Corporate Policy Process, Energy policy (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2022.113178

Courtesy of Mercator Research Institute for Global Mining and Climate Change (MCC) gGmbH

Citation: New Coal Phase Out Study Casts Doubts on ‘Commission’ (2022, August 15) Retrieved August 15, 2022, from https://phys.org/news/2022-08-coal-phase-out-fuels -commissionitis.html

This document is subject to copyright. Except in good faith for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without written permission. The content is provided for informational purposes only.



Reported by Source link

RELATED ARTICLES
- Advertisment -

Most Popular

New Coal Phase-Out Study Fuels Doubts About ‘Commissioner’

Ulrich von Lampe, Mercator Research Institute for Global Mining and Climate Change (MCC) gGmbH

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain

A new research approach that analyzes political discourse through an automated evaluation of the text of comments on the social media platform Twitter now sheds light on a fundamental question of climate policy: does it promote social peace when government solves complex issues in a round table with all relevant stakeholders? A striking example of such a policy is the German Coal Commission 2018/19. The findings are sobering, according to a study conducted by the Berlin Institute for Climate Research MCC (Merctor Research Institute for Global Assets and Climate Change), and published by Energy policy.


Regarding the commission that developed the German, opinions were divided hard coal phased out no later than 2038 and allocated billions of euros to help affected regions. For some, a committee of business experts trade unionspolicy, civil society and academia, was ideal for conflict resolution; others grumbled about “commission” as a substitute for leadership and good communication.

“Traditionally, you gauge the course of public opinion through repeated polls,” says Finn Muller-Hansen, a researcher with MCC’s Applied Sustainability Science working group and lead author of the study. “But it’s expensive and time-consuming – thanks to modern big data techniques, Twitter analysis with its immediate and accurate results is also informative.”

For their study, the research team looked at all German-language Twitter communication in the temporal context of the Coal Commission. They filtered out 558,000 German-language tweets and comments embedded in retweets related to the coal phase-out and 1.8 million tweets and retweets about the climate crisis in general as a baseline for comparison. The comments were then evaluated based on three criteria: first, how positive or negative the respective short message was written, second, what role certain keywords played in it, and third, how the tweets were distributed within the Twitter community.

“The result shows that public discourse on Twitter after the end of the coal commission was even more controversial and generally more negative than before it began,” reports MCC researcher Müller-Hansen. “These trends are more pronounced in statements about phasing out coal than in climate statements from Gen. , suggesting a strong connection with the work of the coal commission.”

The study listed 35 key words, of which, after the completion of the commission’s work, most of the positive ones began to be used less often, and the negative ones – more often. And in terms of retweets, the study reveals increasing modularity, with people talking more closely in their own bubble at the end than at the beginning, even as the Coal Commission sought to bring together different social subgroups and promote cohesion.

“Certainly, the approximately eight million Twitter users in Germany are not fully representative of society, and automated analysis is still a young field of research with potential for further improvement,” explains Jan Minks, head of the MCC working group and co-author of the study.

“Nonetheless, this type of research provides valuable information for policymakers: here it shows how this form of decision-making affects mood in a country — and, more generally, big data analysis of social media can be used to measure mood in different issues of energy, transport, heat, agricultural transition practically in real time.”


Coal Exit Legitimation Strategies in Germany and Canada


Additional information:
Finn Muller-Hansen et al. The German Coal Twitter Debate: Reacting to the Corporate Policy Process, Energy policy (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2022.113178

Courtesy of Mercator Research Institute for Global Mining and Climate Change (MCC) gGmbH

Citation: New Coal Phase Out Study Casts Doubts on ‘Commission’ (2022, August 15) Retrieved August 15, 2022, from https://phys.org/news/2022-08-coal-phase-out-fuels -commissionitis.html

This document is subject to copyright. Except in good faith for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without written permission. The content is provided for informational purposes only.



Reported by Source link

RELATED ARTICLES
- Advertisment -

Most Popular