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The rocket, which is expected to hit the moon, belongs to China, not SpaceX

There are many craters on the moon and a new one is about to appear.

NASA LRO

What’s going to crash in month March 4? In early February, amateur astronomer Bill Gray suggested it was an object probably a spent SpaceX rocket, launched in 2015, and he was aware to punch a new crater on the moon’s surface. It was space archaeologists excitedwhile others complained about the threat of space debris is growing.

On February 12, after reviewing old data, Gray filed an update: the facility is there most likely it is not a SpaceX rocket. Rather, it is the rocket stage that launched China’s Chang’e 5-T1 mission to the moon in 2014.

The rogue object was originally discovered on March 14, 2015 as part of the Catalina Sky Survey and identified as a near-Earth asteroid. The study uses satellites from the Steward Observatory in Arizona to look for rocks in the sky orbiting our planet – some of which can be dangerous. ThesSurvey named the object WE0913A.

Shortly afterwards, Gray identified the object as a second-stage rocket used to launch into orbit the NASA and NOAA deep-space observatory satellites. It stood like this for seven years, until Gray published his original post, in which he noted that the object is about to hit the moon. Of course, the idea that it was a SpaceX rocket ensured that it would get headlines around the world.

And it wasn’t until John Georgini, an engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, wrote Gray an email on Feb. 12 that he began to rethink what the facility might look like.

The trajectory for the Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft did not come close to the Moon – so it would be unusual for a rocket to carry it into space. Gray writes that he has been digging in his archives since 2015 to try to prove that this object was definitely a DSCVR. He couldn’t.

Instead, he writes, it is probably a spent Chinese launch vehicle that was launched on October 23, 2014. This mission was designed to fly around the moon. In short, the Chinese missile fits the data much more accurately. “In a sense, this remains ‘indirect’ evidence,” Gray wrote. “But I would consider it as convincing enough evidence.”

The amplifier does not pose a threat to the Earth’s only natural satellite. It is expected to fall into a crater on the other side of the moon known as Herzsprung. It will not be possible to observe the celestial impact, but in the future, spacecraft orbiting the moon will be able to see this impact.

Reported by Source link

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The rocket, which is expected to hit the moon, belongs to China, not SpaceX

There are many craters on the moon and a new one is about to appear.

NASA LRO

What’s going to crash in month March 4? In early February, amateur astronomer Bill Gray suggested it was an object probably a spent SpaceX rocket, launched in 2015, and he was aware to punch a new crater on the moon’s surface. It was space archaeologists excitedwhile others complained about the threat of space debris is growing.

On February 12, after reviewing old data, Gray filed an update: the facility is there most likely it is not a SpaceX rocket. Rather, it is the rocket stage that launched China’s Chang’e 5-T1 mission to the moon in 2014.

The rogue object was originally discovered on March 14, 2015 as part of the Catalina Sky Survey and identified as a near-Earth asteroid. The study uses satellites from the Steward Observatory in Arizona to look for rocks in the sky orbiting our planet – some of which can be dangerous. ThesSurvey named the object WE0913A.

Shortly afterwards, Gray identified the object as a second-stage rocket used to launch into orbit the NASA and NOAA deep-space observatory satellites. It stood like this for seven years, until Gray published his original post, in which he noted that the object is about to hit the moon. Of course, the idea that it was a SpaceX rocket ensured that it would get headlines around the world.

And it wasn’t until John Georgini, an engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, wrote Gray an email on Feb. 12 that he began to rethink what the facility might look like.

The trajectory for the Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft did not come close to the Moon – so it would be unusual for a rocket to carry it into space. Gray writes that he has been digging in his archives since 2015 to try to prove that this object was definitely a DSCVR. He couldn’t.

Instead, he writes, it is probably a spent Chinese launch vehicle that was launched on October 23, 2014. This mission was designed to fly around the moon. In short, the Chinese missile fits the data much more accurately. “In a sense, this remains ‘indirect’ evidence,” Gray wrote. “But I would consider it as convincing enough evidence.”

The amplifier does not pose a threat to the Earth’s only natural satellite. It is expected to fall into a crater on the other side of the moon known as Herzsprung. It will not be possible to observe the celestial impact, but in the future, spacecraft orbiting the moon will be able to see this impact.

Reported by Source link

RELATED ARTICLES
- Advertisment -

Most Popular