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The ScreenSkills report reveals the scale of the crew shortage in the UK

A new study shows that television without a script has a significant shortage of film crew.

The most acute shortage is felt in production management and in senior editorial positions, and the most difficult to recruit production coordinators, production managers, editors and producers of series.

In addition to the fact that “too few” production coordinators are part of the television sector without a script, the report also found that in the industry of “bleeding” experienced production managers.

The report was made by a government-backed industry body Screen skills in support of the new Unscripted TV Skills Fund, which was launched last year.

Among the conclusions in the report were the recognition of the “particularly acute” lack of skills in the crew with mid-level experience, problems with recruitment and content in all “all genres, roles and production centers”, and lack of all career levels, indicating the problem with observance.

The report also notes that the shortage of crew has been exacerbated by a pandemic that has led to more staff shortages (either due to positive tests, self-isolation or defense) and has also led many people to reconsider their careers in the industry. This became more acute with the boom in production in the UK following the first closure.

But the report concludes: “It is widely acknowledged that recruitment and qualification problems faced by employers have persisted for years, and the Covid-19 pandemic has simply brought to the fore many of the major challenges.”

These include insufficient investment in production roles and high burnout.

The unavailable effects of the deficit include inflation rates, production delays, the forcing of older employees to take on the responsibilities of younger ones and, more critically, excessive promotions of inexperienced staff.

This is particularly worrying, given that the report also found that the most common skills gaps were financial, budgetary, project planning and management.

Some of the solutions proposed in the report were to offer a better work-life balance by increasing budgets and schedules and greater engagement with educational institutions – from schools to universities – to highlight a number of job roles in the sector and encourage new staff. .

Shineid Rocks, managing director of Channel 4 countries and regions, and Jane Moorhead, managing director of Raise the Roof Productions, which heads the Steering Group of the Skills Without Screenplay Television Foundation and the Skills without Screenwriting Skills Foundation, respectively, wrote in a report: polls these measures are needed now. Those of us who participate in the Unscripted TV Skills Fund are striving for just that – to improve the situation after years of underfunding. The commitment of broadcasters, streamers and production companies to increase investment and work together for the benefit of the television industry without a script is fantastic. But, as you will see, a lot needs to be done. “

The full report, which was funded by the BBC, Channel 4 and the Unscripted TV Skills Fund, can read here.



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The ScreenSkills report reveals the scale of the crew shortage in the UK

A new study shows that television without a script has a significant shortage of film crew.

The most acute shortage is felt in production management and in senior editorial positions, and the most difficult to recruit production coordinators, production managers, editors and producers of series.

In addition to the fact that “too few” production coordinators are part of the television sector without a script, the report also found that in the industry of “bleeding” experienced production managers.

The report was made by a government-backed industry body Screen skills in support of the new Unscripted TV Skills Fund, which was launched last year.

Among the conclusions in the report were the recognition of the “particularly acute” lack of skills in the crew with mid-level experience, problems with recruitment and content in all “all genres, roles and production centers”, and lack of all career levels, indicating the problem with observance.

The report also notes that the shortage of crew has been exacerbated by a pandemic that has led to more staff shortages (either due to positive tests, self-isolation or defense) and has also led many people to reconsider their careers in the industry. This became more acute with the boom in production in the UK following the first closure.

But the report concludes: “It is widely acknowledged that recruitment and qualification problems faced by employers have persisted for years, and the Covid-19 pandemic has simply brought to the fore many of the major challenges.”

These include insufficient investment in production roles and high burnout.

The unavailable effects of the deficit include inflation rates, production delays, the forcing of older employees to take on the responsibilities of younger ones and, more critically, excessive promotions of inexperienced staff.

This is particularly worrying, given that the report also found that the most common skills gaps were financial, budgetary, project planning and management.

Some of the solutions proposed in the report were to offer a better work-life balance by increasing budgets and schedules and greater engagement with educational institutions – from schools to universities – to highlight a number of job roles in the sector and encourage new staff. .

Shineid Rocks, managing director of Channel 4 countries and regions, and Jane Moorhead, managing director of Raise the Roof Productions, which heads the Steering Group of the Skills Without Screenplay Television Foundation and the Skills without Screenwriting Skills Foundation, respectively, wrote in a report: polls these measures are needed now. Those of us who participate in the Unscripted TV Skills Fund are striving for just that – to improve the situation after years of underfunding. The commitment of broadcasters, streamers and production companies to increase investment and work together for the benefit of the television industry without a script is fantastic. But, as you will see, a lot needs to be done. “

The full report, which was funded by the BBC, Channel 4 and the Unscripted TV Skills Fund, can read here.



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