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UNG student Anna Möller became the university’s first…

A student at the University of North Georgia and Student Government Association President Anna Moeller is the first ever Rhodes Scholar finalist. Moeller is a senior international student pursuing a degree in psychology with a minor in organizational leadership.

The Rhodes Scholarship is a national postgraduate award for students studying at the University of Oxford in England. It is the oldest and most prestigious international postgraduate scholarship in the world. According to Dr. Anastasia Lin, UNG’s assistant vice president for academic affairs, the Global Rhodes Scholarship applied for by Møller, a Danish citizen, is an extremely competitive international scholarship.

“The entire University of North Georgia community is incredibly proud of Anna and this accomplishment,” said UNG President Bonita S. Jacobs. “Her drive and leadership skills have been evident throughout her time at UNG, and this achievement will propel her to further success.”

According to the university, Rhodes Scholarship finalists are selected based on their outstanding academic achievement, their character, their commitment to others and the common good, and their potential for leadership in whatever areas their careers may lead to.

“I’m still very happy with the process and when asked what I could have done better, they couldn’t pinpoint anything. I just wasn’t the best I could be,” Moeller said.

Lynn, who also directs UNG’s Office of National Competitive Scholarships, nominated Moeller. Lynn says she and several other faculty and staff mentored Moeller through the rigorous application process.

“Anna is unstoppable. She has a unique combination of academic knowledge, leadership acumen and a genuine commitment to making the world a better place,” said Lin. “She has tirelessly honed her skills working on sustainability issues, student government and the honors program.”

Lynn also emphasized that she considers Anna to be the kind of leader the world needs.

“She builds consensus through intelligent, informed and highly skilled dialogue, and then takes effective action that leads to lasting change through community engagement,” she said.

The Rhodes Trust, a British charity founded in honor of the will and testament of Cecil J. Rhodes, provides full financial support to Rhodes Scholars for a degree or degrees at the University of Oxford in the UK.

The scholarship application process involved a rigorous interview process that resulted in Moeller being shortlisted for the scholarship. She later took part in a virtual celebration held on the Oxford campus before the pandemic.

“The event of social interaction unites all candidates. I got to know who I’m up against and the panelists in an informal setting, but that’s still part of the process,” Moeller said. — This is how the tradition has developed that the finalists unite in a society, a community.

The event was followed by a one-on-one interview and she was notified of her finalist status on November 19.

“It is so difficult to become a Rhodes finalist that achieving this status in itself is recognized by companies and universities,” Moeller said.

While at UNG, Mohler was a student leader on the university’s sustainability committee, and she plans to become an environmental scientist and environmental leader.

“I’m unique because I bring a psychological perspective to this in terms of how we can make these environmental solutions really work in communities in countries in terms of what psychological barriers there are to successful collaboration,” she said. .

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UNG student Anna Möller became the university’s first…

A student at the University of North Georgia and Student Government Association President Anna Moeller is the first ever Rhodes Scholar finalist. Moeller is a senior international student pursuing a degree in psychology with a minor in organizational leadership.

The Rhodes Scholarship is a national postgraduate award for students studying at the University of Oxford in England. It is the oldest and most prestigious international postgraduate scholarship in the world. According to Dr. Anastasia Lin, UNG’s assistant vice president for academic affairs, the Global Rhodes Scholarship applied for by Møller, a Danish citizen, is an extremely competitive international scholarship.

“The entire University of North Georgia community is incredibly proud of Anna and this accomplishment,” said UNG President Bonita S. Jacobs. “Her drive and leadership skills have been evident throughout her time at UNG, and this achievement will propel her to further success.”

According to the university, Rhodes Scholarship finalists are selected based on their outstanding academic achievement, their character, their commitment to others and the common good, and their potential for leadership in whatever areas their careers may lead to.

“I’m still very happy with the process and when asked what I could have done better, they couldn’t pinpoint anything. I just wasn’t the best I could be,” Moeller said.

Lynn, who also directs UNG’s Office of National Competitive Scholarships, nominated Moeller. Lynn says she and several other faculty and staff mentored Moeller through the rigorous application process.

“Anna is unstoppable. She has a unique combination of academic knowledge, leadership acumen and a genuine commitment to making the world a better place,” said Lin. “She has tirelessly honed her skills working on sustainability issues, student government and the honors program.”

Lynn also emphasized that she considers Anna to be the kind of leader the world needs.

“She builds consensus through intelligent, informed and highly skilled dialogue, and then takes effective action that leads to lasting change through community engagement,” she said.

The Rhodes Trust, a British charity founded in honor of the will and testament of Cecil J. Rhodes, provides full financial support to Rhodes Scholars for a degree or degrees at the University of Oxford in the UK.

The scholarship application process involved a rigorous interview process that resulted in Moeller being shortlisted for the scholarship. She later took part in a virtual celebration held on the Oxford campus before the pandemic.

“The event of social interaction unites all candidates. I got to know who I’m up against and the panelists in an informal setting, but that’s still part of the process,” Moeller said. — This is how the tradition has developed that the finalists unite in a society, a community.

The event was followed by a one-on-one interview and she was notified of her finalist status on November 19.

“It is so difficult to become a Rhodes finalist that achieving this status in itself is recognized by companies and universities,” Moeller said.

While at UNG, Mohler was a student leader on the university’s sustainability committee, and she plans to become an environmental scientist and environmental leader.

“I’m unique because I bring a psychological perspective to this in terms of how we can make these environmental solutions really work in communities in countries in terms of what psychological barriers there are to successful collaboration,” she said. .

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