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Was Arbery’s murder a hate crime? The jury hears a duel …

BRUNSWICK, GA (AP) – The man who fatally shot Ahmaud Arbury was “just looking for a reason” to harm a black man when he saw a 25-year-old boy jogging on his street, a prosecutor said Monday, citing the murder. . racist comments and videos that Travis McMichael posted online.

And when McMichael, his father and a neighbor started chasing Arbury, they did it not because he did something wrong, but because they thought he did it because he was black, Christopher Perez said.

When McMichale’s father, Greg McMichael, saw Arbury running down the street, “he didn’t grab the phone or call the police,” Perras said. “He called his son and grabbed a gun.”

“There is a big difference between being vigilant and being vigilant,” Peres said, later adding, “It’s important for you to understand the full depth of the defendants’ racial hatred.”

Perez’s comments came as lawyers began their closing arguments in U.S. District Court, where a week ago a hate crime trial began in connection with Arbery’s death.

In his closing remarks Monday, Travis McMichael’s lawyer told the jury that “despite the digital evidence of his racist comments,” there is no evidence of racial violence by Travis McMichael. “

Amy Lee Copeland’s attorney also said there was no evidence that McMichael “ever talked to anyone about Mr. Arbury’s racially motivated death.”

It’s been almost two years since the 25-year-old Arbury was killed in two gunshots on February 23, 2020 after a five-minute chase through a Satilla Shores unit near the port city of Brunswick. The murder was recorded on video from a mobile phone, which caused outrage far beyond Georgia.

The main facts of the case are not disputed. McMichales armed himself and chased after Arbury in a pickup truck after he was spotted past their home on Sunday afternoon. A neighbor, William “Roddy” Brian, joined the chase in his own truck and recorded a video in which Travis McMichael fired deadly shots at point-blank range.

McMichael and Brian were convicted of murder last fall in a Georgian court. The U.S. Department of Justice has charged them separately in federal court with hate crimes, alleging that all three men violated Arbery’s civil rights and attacked him because he is black. They are also accused of attempted kidnapping, and McMichals is accused of using weapons in committing a crime.

Regardless of the outcome of the hate crimes case, McMichaels was sentenced to life in prison without parole for murder. Brian has also received a life sentence, and parole is only possible after he has served at least 30 years.

The federal hate crime trial is concerned with whether racism motivated the persecution and murder of Arberi. Legal experts say it is harder to prove than the crime of murder. McMichael and Brian pleaded not guilty.

Summarizing previous racist insults committed by the troika, Peres remarked: “The defendants were not just making racial assumptions; they made racial decisions. They decided to act on the basis of these assumptions. “

Defendants’ reaction to Arbery’s death was further evidence of their racial hostility, said Perras, who noted that none of them tried to help him after he was shot. Instead, Greg McMichael spoke to police “like a man who had just returned from a hunt and wanted to talk about the thrill of hunting.”

McMichael and Bryant considered Arbury an animal and “treated him like an animal,” Perras said.

Lawyers insist the troika harassed Arbury on the basis of a serious, albeit erroneous, suspicion that he had committed crimes in their neighborhood. Before the day of the shooting, security cameras repeatedly recorded Arbery in a construction house a few doors below McMichael’s house. Greg McMichael told police he recognized Arbury when he ran out of the same unfinished house on the day of the shooting.

Greg McMichael’s lawyer, AJ Balbo, said Monday that his client had previously encountered white people suspected of possible crimes in the area. Balba said his client was chasing Arbury not because he was a black man, but because he was “THAT man” seen in the house.

“I’m not here to tell you that racism doesn’t exist; obviously so, ”Balba told the jury. “I’m not here to tell you that racial profiling doesn’t exist; it exists … In this case, based on the evidence you’ve heard, ”the government has not proven this against Greg McMichael, he said.

The security video showed Arbury taking nothing out of the construction site. The officer told McMichals that there was no evidence of his theft. Brian, who knew nothing about the security records, told investigators he believed Arbury had done something wrong when he ran past Brian’s house with McMichaley in pursuit.

FBI agents found about two dozen racist text messages and messages on social media from McMichael and Brian in the years and months leading up to the shooting.

In 2018, Travis McMichael commented on a Facebook video in which a black man jokes about a white man: “I would kill that devil.” Greg McMichael posted a meme on Facebook saying that white Irish “slaves” were treated worse than any race in US history. And for several years on Martin Luther King Day, Brian wrote messages in which he ridiculed the celebration of honoring the leader of civil rights.

Some witnesses testified that they heard McMichael’s racist statements firsthand. The woman, who served under Travis McMichael in the U.S. Coast Guard ten years ago, said he made rough sexual jokes when he learned she was dating a black man and called her a “p -— lover.” Another woman testified that Greg McMichael spoke angrily in 2015 when she noticed the death of civil rights activist Julian Bond, saying, “All these Negroes are nothing but trouble.”

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Was Arbery’s murder a hate crime? The jury hears a duel …

BRUNSWICK, GA (AP) – The man who fatally shot Ahmaud Arbury was “just looking for a reason” to harm a black man when he saw a 25-year-old boy jogging on his street, a prosecutor said Monday, citing the murder. . racist comments and videos that Travis McMichael posted online.

And when McMichael, his father and a neighbor started chasing Arbury, they did it not because he did something wrong, but because they thought he did it because he was black, Christopher Perez said.

When McMichale’s father, Greg McMichael, saw Arbury running down the street, “he didn’t grab the phone or call the police,” Perras said. “He called his son and grabbed a gun.”

“There is a big difference between being vigilant and being vigilant,” Peres said, later adding, “It’s important for you to understand the full depth of the defendants’ racial hatred.”

Perez’s comments came as lawyers began their closing arguments in U.S. District Court, where a week ago a hate crime trial began in connection with Arbery’s death.

In his closing remarks Monday, Travis McMichael’s lawyer told the jury that “despite the digital evidence of his racist comments,” there is no evidence of racial violence by Travis McMichael. “

Amy Lee Copeland’s attorney also said there was no evidence that McMichael “ever talked to anyone about Mr. Arbury’s racially motivated death.”

It’s been almost two years since the 25-year-old Arbury was killed in two gunshots on February 23, 2020 after a five-minute chase through a Satilla Shores unit near the port city of Brunswick. The murder was recorded on video from a mobile phone, which caused outrage far beyond Georgia.

The main facts of the case are not disputed. McMichales armed himself and chased after Arbury in a pickup truck after he was spotted past their home on Sunday afternoon. A neighbor, William “Roddy” Brian, joined the chase in his own truck and recorded a video in which Travis McMichael fired deadly shots at point-blank range.

McMichael and Brian were convicted of murder last fall in a Georgian court. The U.S. Department of Justice has charged them separately in federal court with hate crimes, alleging that all three men violated Arbery’s civil rights and attacked him because he is black. They are also accused of attempted kidnapping, and McMichals is accused of using weapons in committing a crime.

Regardless of the outcome of the hate crimes case, McMichaels was sentenced to life in prison without parole for murder. Brian has also received a life sentence, and parole is only possible after he has served at least 30 years.

The federal hate crime trial is concerned with whether racism motivated the persecution and murder of Arberi. Legal experts say it is harder to prove than the crime of murder. McMichael and Brian pleaded not guilty.

Summarizing previous racist insults committed by the troika, Peres remarked: “The defendants were not just making racial assumptions; they made racial decisions. They decided to act on the basis of these assumptions. “

Defendants’ reaction to Arbery’s death was further evidence of their racial hostility, said Perras, who noted that none of them tried to help him after he was shot. Instead, Greg McMichael spoke to police “like a man who had just returned from a hunt and wanted to talk about the thrill of hunting.”

McMichael and Bryant considered Arbury an animal and “treated him like an animal,” Perras said.

Lawyers insist the troika harassed Arbury on the basis of a serious, albeit erroneous, suspicion that he had committed crimes in their neighborhood. Before the day of the shooting, security cameras repeatedly recorded Arbery in a construction house a few doors below McMichael’s house. Greg McMichael told police he recognized Arbury when he ran out of the same unfinished house on the day of the shooting.

Greg McMichael’s lawyer, AJ Balbo, said Monday that his client had previously encountered white people suspected of possible crimes in the area. Balba said his client was chasing Arbury not because he was a black man, but because he was “THAT man” seen in the house.

“I’m not here to tell you that racism doesn’t exist; obviously so, ”Balba told the jury. “I’m not here to tell you that racial profiling doesn’t exist; it exists … In this case, based on the evidence you’ve heard, ”the government has not proven this against Greg McMichael, he said.

The security video showed Arbury taking nothing out of the construction site. The officer told McMichals that there was no evidence of his theft. Brian, who knew nothing about the security records, told investigators he believed Arbury had done something wrong when he ran past Brian’s house with McMichaley in pursuit.

FBI agents found about two dozen racist text messages and messages on social media from McMichael and Brian in the years and months leading up to the shooting.

In 2018, Travis McMichael commented on a Facebook video in which a black man jokes about a white man: “I would kill that devil.” Greg McMichael posted a meme on Facebook saying that white Irish “slaves” were treated worse than any race in US history. And for several years on Martin Luther King Day, Brian wrote messages in which he ridiculed the celebration of honoring the leader of civil rights.

Some witnesses testified that they heard McMichael’s racist statements firsthand. The woman, who served under Travis McMichael in the U.S. Coast Guard ten years ago, said he made rough sexual jokes when he learned she was dating a black man and called her a “p -— lover.” Another woman testified that Greg McMichael spoke angrily in 2015 when she noticed the death of civil rights activist Julian Bond, saying, “All these Negroes are nothing but trouble.”

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