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What is Parc fermé and what does it mean?

In Formula One, teams are constantly pushing the boundaries (and trying to “change” the rules), while the governing body, the FIA, is constantly trying to keep dominance tough and ensure everyone is playing fair.

A key part of this process is to verify the legality of cars in Ferme Park and to restrict teams to Ferme Park conditions over the weekend – but what does that mean and how does it affect teams?


Winning Formula One is a very well-established plan. The same goes for poker. See where your game plan can take you. Click here to start your game plan.

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What does Parc fermé mean?

The term parc fermé is a French phrase that translates literally as “closed park”. Traditionally, this refers to a safe area on the track where cars are checked for legality and safety.

Inspections include measurements of weight and dimensions carried out using laser technology, as well as inspections of equipment during which labels are inspected to ensure that parts have been pre-tested and meet relevant standards.

In modern Formula 1, the “park farm” also refers to certain periods of time during the Grand Prix weekend, when cars are in garages, but are under the sight of a columnist, and teams are limited in the work they can perform.

Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes, arrives at Farm Park after sprint

Photo: Andy Hon / Drawings of motorsport

What is the difference between parc fermé and parc fermé?

Parc fermé is a fenced area controlled by the FIA ​​with limited access for teams. It is located near the FIA ​​garages, usually near the podium so that the top three can easily get from there to the ceremony after the race.

It is not possible to work with the car in this area, but three mechanics and the corresponding equipment should be present to disconnect systems, to support equipment in cooling and to support employees during all process of check.

Conversely, when cars are parked, they can be either on the track or in garages. Teams can touch them, but they can only make certain definite changes.

Should cars be called to a farm park or put in a park setting?

Teams are called to visit the park fermé or have to work in the park fermé many times over the weekend.

At the beginning of the weekend, each team checks their car and declares it legal, but to make sure they are telling the truth, the FIA ​​calls at least six cars for inspection at Ferme Park after training.

Teams can change their cars at will (within the rules) until the start of qualifying, but as soon as the green light appears on Q1, all cars from now until the start of the race will be placed in the Ferme Park.

Any car that qualifies in Q1 or Q2 will return to the team’s garage where it will be parked and remain under the watchful eye of the steward if the team is present.

Any cars running in the third quarter must pass to the Ferme Physical Park after the session to check for legality and safety. They are then released back to the garage with a check, again in a park setting.

After the race all classified finishers must go directly to the Parc fermé to check legality and safety. It takes 1-2 hours, sometimes longer, after which the machines are released back to the teams. One car will be randomly selected to stay for a deeper inspection.

The possibility of detecting violations and imposing fines means that the actual result of the race is not decided and confirmed only some time after spraying champagne.

Daniel Ricciardo's car, McLaren MCL35M, in Ferme Park

Daniel Ricciardo’s car, McLaren MCL35M, in Ferme Park

Photo: Charles Coates / Drawings of motorsport

How do the Parc fermé conditions work?

Before each car leaves the pit lane for qualifying, the teams will hand over a setup table to the FIA ​​technical delegate. This is a clear setting that they must follow until the end of qualifying and the race.

Teams may perform certain maintenance work in a Parc fermé environment, including replacing identical parts, but they are not allowed to change any parts on the car or change the suspension settings.

One caretaker is dedicated to staying with each car and ensuring that unauthorized work is not performed at any time in a Parc fermé environment. If the rules are broken, this car will have to start the race from the pit lane.

What is a team allowed to do in a Parc fermé environment?

The FIA ​​regulations list more than 20 different specific jobs that can be performed with a car in a park environment. Anything not included in the list requires special written permission.

Engines can run, add or remove fuel, as well as install a fuel breather and remove the spark plugs to conduct an internal inspection of the engine and check for compression in the cylinders. Energy storage devices can also be charged or discharged.

You can remove the brake system, drain the engine oil, drain or add compressed gases, and drain or refill other fluids if the fluid replacement meets the same characteristics as the original.

Wheels, fasteners and tires can be removed, changed or balanced, as well as check tire pressure. You can install heating or cooling devices, as well as connect the battery so that the electronics can be accessed through a physical connection.

The front wing can be adjusted with existing parts, but no parts can be added, removed or replaced. The body can be removed, cosmetic changes, add tape and clean any part of the car.

On-board cameras, marshalling systems and time transponders can be removed, re-equipped or tested. You can also change the mirrors, seat belts and pedals, and the beverage bottle can be filled up to 1.5 liters.

All parts removed for work or safety checks must be near the vehicle in the field of view of the appointed inspector. Everything needs to be restored back to as it was before the car left the pit lane.

Max Ferstappen, Red Bull Racing, arrives at Parc Ferme after qualifying

Max Ferstappen, Red Bull Racing, arrives at Parc Ferme after qualifying

Photo: Charles Coates / Drawings of motorsport

What if the car was damaged?

The rules allow for “repairing real damage as a result of an accident”, but as defined – a rather gray area.

Cars often require refinement after qualifying, as the areas closest to the track – such as the floor, diffuser or front wing – can be damaged by hitting the curb or debris. If the driver has a shutdown, it can be a lot more work than that.

Teams must send a written request to the FIA ​​Technical Delegate, in which they will clearly define any spare parts they need to install. They must be “identical in design and similar in mass, inertia and function” to the original.

Repairs must be carried out – as well as any work carried out in the park – in the presence of a designated inspector, and any parts that are removed are stored in the FIA.

In emergencies – such as mid-qualification or online – changes may be made without written permission if it is fair to believe that permission will be given and any remote parts will be visible checks.

What about changing the gearbox or power unit?

Certain items must be used for a certain number of races before substitution, otherwise the team will be penalized. This penalty will be paid regardless of whether the required change is due to failure, breakage or for performance.

Gearboxes must be used for at least six races before they can be changed. If a team needs to change one before that, it faces a penalty online. If the team needs to change the chassis, it will have to start with the pit lane.

The power unit is more complex as it is divided into different components. Each driver is only allowed a certain amount of each element in the power unit during the season, but he can replace them if he wants.

No more than three engines are allowed, three heat generator motors (MSU-H), three turbochargers, two energy storage devices, two control electronics, three kinetic motor generators (MSU-K) and eight sets of engine exhaust systems. .

If they use more than the allotted amount of any of the items, they are fined a place in the network. This is 10 places for the first request of each part, 5 for the second, and the back of the network if more than 15 are accumulated.

F1 engine

F1 engine

Photo: Giorgio Piola

How is the use of engines controlled by the team?

The FIA ​​attaches seals to all parts of the team’s power unit before it is used for the first time. This defines the engine as a new engine and ensures that significant moving parts cannot be repaired or replaced.

The seals are removed when the engine is in working order, but within two hours after the end of the race parc fermé all used elements of the power unit are resealed to ensure that they can not be started or dismantled between activities.

At the next event, where this element of the power unit will be used, the FIA ​​will remove these seals again, and all elements must remain in the garage if they are not installed on the car. They cannot be run at any time except on the participating car.

When can teams work on their cars?

Teams have three and a half hours after qualifying to work on the cars before they have to stop during the day. At night, the cars are covered, and the FIA ​​applies seals so they are not touched.

In some cases, teams may give permission from the technical delegate to keep one car for marketing purposes, but no work with it is possible and it must be covered and sealed no more than two hours after the initial deadline.

On Sunday morning, five hours and 10 minutes before the start of the formation round, the seals and covers could come off and the teams can work on them again, still, of course, in the park.

An hour before the start of the race, all teams are informed about the work done by other teams during this period of the Parc fermé conditions – which can be an interesting read.

F1 driver on the net in the rain

F1 driver on the net in the rain

Photo by Mark Satan / Drawings of motorsport

What will happen if it rains?

Cars designed for dry conditions cannot easily run in wet air, so if the weather changes or seems to change, Race Control may announce “climate change” and slightly relax parc fermé conditions.

The teams can then change the brake channels and radiator channels to reduce or increase the cooling and change the Pitot tubes used for the measurement. They can also change the headrest around the driver as there are three different types suitable for three different temperature ranges.

On the network, if conditions are deemed wet enough to declare it a “wet race,” teams can change the set of slippery tires intended for the race, and install full or intermediate rain tires ready for the start.

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What is Parc fermé and what does it mean?

In Formula One, teams are constantly pushing the boundaries (and trying to “change” the rules), while the governing body, the FIA, is constantly trying to keep dominance tough and ensure everyone is playing fair.

A key part of this process is to verify the legality of cars in Ferme Park and to restrict teams to Ferme Park conditions over the weekend – but what does that mean and how does it affect teams?


Winning Formula One is a very well-established plan. The same goes for poker. See where your game plan can take you. Click here to start your game plan.

18+, only for new players from the UK, minimum deposit £ 10, full provision, begambleaware.org, play responsibly


What does Parc fermé mean?

The term parc fermé is a French phrase that translates literally as “closed park”. Traditionally, this refers to a safe area on the track where cars are checked for legality and safety.

Inspections include measurements of weight and dimensions carried out using laser technology, as well as inspections of equipment during which labels are inspected to ensure that parts have been pre-tested and meet relevant standards.

In modern Formula 1, the “park farm” also refers to certain periods of time during the Grand Prix weekend, when cars are in garages, but are under the sight of a columnist, and teams are limited in the work they can perform.

Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes, arrives at Farm Park after sprint

Photo: Andy Hon / Drawings of motorsport

What is the difference between parc fermé and parc fermé?

Parc fermé is a fenced area controlled by the FIA ​​with limited access for teams. It is located near the FIA ​​garages, usually near the podium so that the top three can easily get from there to the ceremony after the race.

It is not possible to work with the car in this area, but three mechanics and the corresponding equipment should be present to disconnect systems, to support equipment in cooling and to support employees during all process of check.

Conversely, when cars are parked, they can be either on the track or in garages. Teams can touch them, but they can only make certain definite changes.

Should cars be called to a farm park or put in a park setting?

Teams are called to visit the park fermé or have to work in the park fermé many times over the weekend.

At the beginning of the weekend, each team checks their car and declares it legal, but to make sure they are telling the truth, the FIA ​​calls at least six cars for inspection at Ferme Park after training.

Teams can change their cars at will (within the rules) until the start of qualifying, but as soon as the green light appears on Q1, all cars from now until the start of the race will be placed in the Ferme Park.

Any car that qualifies in Q1 or Q2 will return to the team’s garage where it will be parked and remain under the watchful eye of the steward if the team is present.

Any cars running in the third quarter must pass to the Ferme Physical Park after the session to check for legality and safety. They are then released back to the garage with a check, again in a park setting.

After the race all classified finishers must go directly to the Parc fermé to check legality and safety. It takes 1-2 hours, sometimes longer, after which the machines are released back to the teams. One car will be randomly selected to stay for a deeper inspection.

The possibility of detecting violations and imposing fines means that the actual result of the race is not decided and confirmed only some time after spraying champagne.

Daniel Ricciardo's car, McLaren MCL35M, in Ferme Park

Daniel Ricciardo’s car, McLaren MCL35M, in Ferme Park

Photo: Charles Coates / Drawings of motorsport

How do the Parc fermé conditions work?

Before each car leaves the pit lane for qualifying, the teams will hand over a setup table to the FIA ​​technical delegate. This is a clear setting that they must follow until the end of qualifying and the race.

Teams may perform certain maintenance work in a Parc fermé environment, including replacing identical parts, but they are not allowed to change any parts on the car or change the suspension settings.

One caretaker is dedicated to staying with each car and ensuring that unauthorized work is not performed at any time in a Parc fermé environment. If the rules are broken, this car will have to start the race from the pit lane.

What is a team allowed to do in a Parc fermé environment?

The FIA ​​regulations list more than 20 different specific jobs that can be performed with a car in a park environment. Anything not included in the list requires special written permission.

Engines can run, add or remove fuel, as well as install a fuel breather and remove the spark plugs to conduct an internal inspection of the engine and check for compression in the cylinders. Energy storage devices can also be charged or discharged.

You can remove the brake system, drain the engine oil, drain or add compressed gases, and drain or refill other fluids if the fluid replacement meets the same characteristics as the original.

Wheels, fasteners and tires can be removed, changed or balanced, as well as check tire pressure. You can install heating or cooling devices, as well as connect the battery so that the electronics can be accessed through a physical connection.

The front wing can be adjusted with existing parts, but no parts can be added, removed or replaced. The body can be removed, cosmetic changes, add tape and clean any part of the car.

On-board cameras, marshalling systems and time transponders can be removed, re-equipped or tested. You can also change the mirrors, seat belts and pedals, and the beverage bottle can be filled up to 1.5 liters.

All parts removed for work or safety checks must be near the vehicle in the field of view of the appointed inspector. Everything needs to be restored back to as it was before the car left the pit lane.

Max Ferstappen, Red Bull Racing, arrives at Parc Ferme after qualifying

Max Ferstappen, Red Bull Racing, arrives at Parc Ferme after qualifying

Photo: Charles Coates / Drawings of motorsport

What if the car was damaged?

The rules allow for “repairing real damage as a result of an accident”, but as defined – a rather gray area.

Cars often require refinement after qualifying, as the areas closest to the track – such as the floor, diffuser or front wing – can be damaged by hitting the curb or debris. If the driver has a shutdown, it can be a lot more work than that.

Teams must send a written request to the FIA ​​Technical Delegate, in which they will clearly define any spare parts they need to install. They must be “identical in design and similar in mass, inertia and function” to the original.

Repairs must be carried out – as well as any work carried out in the park – in the presence of a designated inspector, and any parts that are removed are stored in the FIA.

In emergencies – such as mid-qualification or online – changes may be made without written permission if it is fair to believe that permission will be given and any remote parts will be visible checks.

What about changing the gearbox or power unit?

Certain items must be used for a certain number of races before substitution, otherwise the team will be penalized. This penalty will be paid regardless of whether the required change is due to failure, breakage or for performance.

Gearboxes must be used for at least six races before they can be changed. If a team needs to change one before that, it faces a penalty online. If the team needs to change the chassis, it will have to start with the pit lane.

The power unit is more complex as it is divided into different components. Each driver is only allowed a certain amount of each element in the power unit during the season, but he can replace them if he wants.

No more than three engines are allowed, three heat generator motors (MSU-H), three turbochargers, two energy storage devices, two control electronics, three kinetic motor generators (MSU-K) and eight sets of engine exhaust systems. .

If they use more than the allotted amount of any of the items, they are fined a place in the network. This is 10 places for the first request of each part, 5 for the second, and the back of the network if more than 15 are accumulated.

F1 engine

F1 engine

Photo: Giorgio Piola

How is the use of engines controlled by the team?

The FIA ​​attaches seals to all parts of the team’s power unit before it is used for the first time. This defines the engine as a new engine and ensures that significant moving parts cannot be repaired or replaced.

The seals are removed when the engine is in working order, but within two hours after the end of the race parc fermé all used elements of the power unit are resealed to ensure that they can not be started or dismantled between activities.

At the next event, where this element of the power unit will be used, the FIA ​​will remove these seals again, and all elements must remain in the garage if they are not installed on the car. They cannot be run at any time except on the participating car.

When can teams work on their cars?

Teams have three and a half hours after qualifying to work on the cars before they have to stop during the day. At night, the cars are covered, and the FIA ​​applies seals so they are not touched.

In some cases, teams may give permission from the technical delegate to keep one car for marketing purposes, but no work with it is possible and it must be covered and sealed no more than two hours after the initial deadline.

On Sunday morning, five hours and 10 minutes before the start of the formation round, the seals and covers could come off and the teams can work on them again, still, of course, in the park.

An hour before the start of the race, all teams are informed about the work done by other teams during this period of the Parc fermé conditions – which can be an interesting read.

F1 driver on the net in the rain

F1 driver on the net in the rain

Photo by Mark Satan / Drawings of motorsport

What will happen if it rains?

Cars designed for dry conditions cannot easily run in wet air, so if the weather changes or seems to change, Race Control may announce “climate change” and slightly relax parc fermé conditions.

The teams can then change the brake channels and radiator channels to reduce or increase the cooling and change the Pitot tubes used for the measurement. They can also change the headrest around the driver as there are three different types suitable for three different temperature ranges.

On the network, if conditions are deemed wet enough to declare it a “wet race,” teams can change the set of slippery tires intended for the race, and install full or intermediate rain tires ready for the start.

Reported by Source link

RELATED ARTICLES
- Advertisment -

Most Popular