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What’s the difference? | Popular science

Long before there were dozens of companies producing hundreds of USB microphones, Blue Microphones introduced the Yeti in 2009 and for some time claimed to be one of the best USB podcast microphones. With increasing competition, blue yeti had to evolve, and the last iteration, Yeti X, can argue that it is clearer … for the price. But how wide is this generation gap? If you are looking for the best mic for any of your projects and you have narrowed it down to Blue Yeti Microphones are likely to compare the classics to the new hot, so here’s our Yeti vs. Yeti X tutorial to help you make a decision.

Something wrong with the original Blue Yeti microphone? Why another version?

The original Yeti microphone is a common feature on the tables of many podcasters. Marcus Rovita

The Blue Yeti USB microphone ($ 109.99) was originally launched as a premium USB microphone designed for professional, semi-professional and novice broadcasters, singers and musicians. At the time, many USB microphones looked like new and lacked the professional features and quality of audio broadcasting standards, such as Shure SM7B. The Yeti has raised the bar of the quality of the USB microphone and over the years has become one of the most popular models in the world.

Since then, however, the landscape of the USB microphone has exploded with professional options that match or surpass the Yeti. Blue has kept pace by introducing a series of Yeti USB microphones for a variety of needs. For example, the $ 79.99 Yeti Nano is a smaller microphone with fewer options, while the $ 249.99 Yeti Pro adds features targeted to musicians such as XLR audio connectivity and 24-bit / 192 studio-level resolution. kHz.

Although they are designed for specific uses, the Yeti X for $ 169.99 is the closest to an updated and improved version of the original Blue Yeti USB microphone. Yeti X improves sound quality, updates the design and adds some additional features, while maintaining the same basic capabilities and connectivity as the Yeti. But the original Yeti is still a great, handy option for a new streamer or podcaster who wants to plug and play, a reliable USB microphone with proven sound. There’s nothing wrong with the original, so potential buyers have questions about whether they want extra Yeti X features, and if so, are they worth the extra $ 60? Let’s discuss…

Yeti vs. Yeti X microphones: what are the differences?

Blue received critical acclaim when he presented Yeti X in 2020, as the update adds a small contribution to everything that makes its best-selling predecessor. The Yeti X increases the resolution of digital audio to 24-bit / 48kHz compared to the Yeti’s 16-bit / 48kHz. Theoretically, greater bit depth represents a significant increase in the digital data contained for more accurate sound reproduction. In practice, many people may not notice a difference in sound quality, and many users may not even need additional audio resolution in their streams, podcasts, and other broadcasts.

However, the Yeti X has another trick up its sleeve, which is the fourth capsule of the capacitor compared to the three Yeti capacitors. Capacitor capsules in microphones convert sound waves in the microphone signal, so having four instead of three capacitors can contribute to greater sound clarity. At comparable prices, many other USB microphones nowadays also use four capacitors to record audio.

Aesthetically the Yeti X looks more refined in its design and has more shiny microphone and base trim elements. The flatter mic head contributes to the retro-futuristic appeal of the Yeti X. The Yeti X is also slightly smaller than the Yeti, but weighs slightly more; including a microphone and stand, the Yeti X weighs 2.8 pounds, compared to 2.2 pounds for the Yeti and its stand.

Perhaps the most noticeable visual difference is the multi-colored multi-function LED ring around the Yeti X level encoder / mute button on the front. By default, these LEDs show the microphone input level meter in green, yellow and red, so you can immediately see if your levels are too hot. The encoder also controls microphone input levels, headphone volume and balance control between microphone volume and computer volume. By holding down the mute button, you can switch between level modes, and the LEDs show the levels when you turn the encoder. This Yeti X feature gives you all the level controls on the front, while the Yeti has a headphone volume knob on the front and a microphone input level knob on the back. In addition to the fact that the Yeti X LED ring looks cooler, it gives you an additional balance control function, which the Yeti does not have.

Finally, the Yeti X gives you additional capabilities combined with Logitech G Hub desktop software. Using the G Hub, you can customize the colors of Yeti X LED rings and apply Blue VO! CE vocal effects, which are equalizer settings to process your voice with presets, including “Warm and Vintage”, “Parts and Modern “And” AM Radio “—or dial a number in your own settings.

Cool than similar Yeti and Yeti X?

Yeti X in front of Yeti and MacBook
The Yeti X adds a few small but noticeable improvements to the original, which is still capable. Marcus Rovita

Both microphones are powered by USB and can be disconnected from mounting bases on standard microphone stands or brackets. Separating the Yeti from the stand can send a few small washers, which are easily lost, in all directions, and these parts also make it difficult to attach the Yeti to the stand. Fortunately, the Yeti X design does not use any of these washers, so detaching and attaching it to the stand and off the stand provides a better experience.

Both microphones are also very sensitive to sound capture and have the same four capture patterns – internal settings that focus the audio recording of the microphone on specific areas in front, behind or around it. These four models are: cardioid (front), most common for a single person talking or singing; omnidirectional (360 degrees), best for representing the whole atmosphere of space; bidirectional (front and rear), ideal for two people sitting opposite each other; and a stereo that creates a wide sound image and is well suited for recording instruments or multiple sound sources in front of a microphone. The Yeti control template for selecting these pickup patterns (dial) is a bit difficult to switch, but the Yeti X uses the best push-button switch with LED icons to display the active pattern.

Once installed, the original Yeti has earned its esteemed reputation for combining clear, strong, detailed sound with rugged and durable metallic design and a professional look. It also has a headphone output that allows you to control the microphone input without delay while listening to audio from your computer – a great and very convenient feature. The Yeti X also has all of these features, with the aforementioned improved sound quality.

Is the Yeti X’s sound quality noticeably improved?

When comparing 16-bit / 48kHz recordings with Yeti with 24-bit / 48kHz recordings with Yeti X, there is a noticeable difference in the accuracy of Yeti vs. Yeti X. Yeti sounds a little harsher for “esses” and other consonant sounds as well as sounds breathing. The spoken words are clearer, and the musical instruments sound a little more textured and resonant on the Yeti X. Even when comparing the 16-bit / 48kHz recordings from both microphones, there was a smaller but still noticeable difference in clarity emanating from the Yeti X.

Note: If you want to get full audio separation from Yeti X, you may need to delve into the settings of recording software or streaming software to use 24-bit / 48 kHz resolution.

With all that said, unprepared listeners often don’t notice the difference between 16-bit audio and high resolution (above 16-bit). And millions of people listen to podcasts and live broadcasts every day in compressed audio formats such as MP3, and in this case, using a microphone with 24-bit or 16-bit audio will not matter.

If I just record myself in a conversation, why should I have a Yeti X?

Black Yeti X in a darkened room.
Yeti X LED lights can stand out live. Marcus Rovita

Although the practical need for 24-bit audio is not currently essential for many podcasters and streamers, the Yeti X still has an advantage in clarity over the Yeti because of its fourth capacitor. And if you start a podcast or other type of show in 2021, there is now a push to lossless audio in streaming services, so it may not hurt to “secure the future” of your setup in a way with a 24-bit audio USB microphone. which will remain relevant as sound quality expectations continue to grow over time. For example, 24-bit / 48 kHz audio (or higher) is already the preferred choice for recording music so that it can be delivered in high definition formats.

Aside from audio, the Yeti X may be more appealing to those who think about the look of their microphone on camera for their videos on YouTube, Instagram, TikTok and so on. Do you think the Yeti or Yeti X looks better – this is a subjective question, but having an LED level meter with customizable colors is certainly a way to stand out, and the Yeti X is at least much rarer (at the moment), while Blue claims millions of original Yeti are currently in use.

So is the original Yeti still good enough?

There are a lot of people who use Blue Microphones Yeti today for podcasts, Twitch streams, YouTube channels, etc., and their shows probably don’t suffer at all from using Yeti instead of Yeti X. So if you really want to save money or if you just prefer the silver or blue Yeti colors that are not available for the Yeti X, which just comes in black or white, you will get one of the best USB microphones for that money in the original Yeti.

On the other hand, you’ll also get a significant amount of improvements for the extra $ 60 for the Yeti X, which upgrades the Yeti in almost every way possible. The Yeti X offers clearer, richer sound from an optional capacitor capsule and digital audio separation, additional practical audio controls, a customizable multi-color ring for measuring LED levels, voice equalizer settings through software and a clearer design that offers more experience. microphone to stand.

Regardless of the model chosen, Blue Yeti against Yeti X The debate features USB microphones that have earned a reputation as the top two for their price. In the USB microphone market, the Yetis are strong in design but sound-sensitive, accurate, reliable and easy to use, plug-and-play options for PC-based broadcasting and smart devices.



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What’s the difference? | Popular science

Long before there were dozens of companies producing hundreds of USB microphones, Blue Microphones introduced the Yeti in 2009 and for some time claimed to be one of the best USB podcast microphones. With increasing competition, blue yeti had to evolve, and the last iteration, Yeti X, can argue that it is clearer … for the price. But how wide is this generation gap? If you are looking for the best mic for any of your projects and you have narrowed it down to Blue Yeti Microphones are likely to compare the classics to the new hot, so here’s our Yeti vs. Yeti X tutorial to help you make a decision.

Something wrong with the original Blue Yeti microphone? Why another version?

The original Yeti microphone is a common feature on the tables of many podcasters. Marcus Rovita

The Blue Yeti USB microphone ($ 109.99) was originally launched as a premium USB microphone designed for professional, semi-professional and novice broadcasters, singers and musicians. At the time, many USB microphones looked like new and lacked the professional features and quality of audio broadcasting standards, such as Shure SM7B. The Yeti has raised the bar of the quality of the USB microphone and over the years has become one of the most popular models in the world.

Since then, however, the landscape of the USB microphone has exploded with professional options that match or surpass the Yeti. Blue has kept pace by introducing a series of Yeti USB microphones for a variety of needs. For example, the $ 79.99 Yeti Nano is a smaller microphone with fewer options, while the $ 249.99 Yeti Pro adds features targeted to musicians such as XLR audio connectivity and 24-bit / 192 studio-level resolution. kHz.

Although they are designed for specific uses, the Yeti X for $ 169.99 is the closest to an updated and improved version of the original Blue Yeti USB microphone. Yeti X improves sound quality, updates the design and adds some additional features, while maintaining the same basic capabilities and connectivity as the Yeti. But the original Yeti is still a great, handy option for a new streamer or podcaster who wants to plug and play, a reliable USB microphone with proven sound. There’s nothing wrong with the original, so potential buyers have questions about whether they want extra Yeti X features, and if so, are they worth the extra $ 60? Let’s discuss…

Yeti vs. Yeti X microphones: what are the differences?

Blue received critical acclaim when he presented Yeti X in 2020, as the update adds a small contribution to everything that makes its best-selling predecessor. The Yeti X increases the resolution of digital audio to 24-bit / 48kHz compared to the Yeti’s 16-bit / 48kHz. Theoretically, greater bit depth represents a significant increase in the digital data contained for more accurate sound reproduction. In practice, many people may not notice a difference in sound quality, and many users may not even need additional audio resolution in their streams, podcasts, and other broadcasts.

However, the Yeti X has another trick up its sleeve, which is the fourth capsule of the capacitor compared to the three Yeti capacitors. Capacitor capsules in microphones convert sound waves in the microphone signal, so having four instead of three capacitors can contribute to greater sound clarity. At comparable prices, many other USB microphones nowadays also use four capacitors to record audio.

Aesthetically the Yeti X looks more refined in its design and has more shiny microphone and base trim elements. The flatter mic head contributes to the retro-futuristic appeal of the Yeti X. The Yeti X is also slightly smaller than the Yeti, but weighs slightly more; including a microphone and stand, the Yeti X weighs 2.8 pounds, compared to 2.2 pounds for the Yeti and its stand.

Perhaps the most noticeable visual difference is the multi-colored multi-function LED ring around the Yeti X level encoder / mute button on the front. By default, these LEDs show the microphone input level meter in green, yellow and red, so you can immediately see if your levels are too hot. The encoder also controls microphone input levels, headphone volume and balance control between microphone volume and computer volume. By holding down the mute button, you can switch between level modes, and the LEDs show the levels when you turn the encoder. This Yeti X feature gives you all the level controls on the front, while the Yeti has a headphone volume knob on the front and a microphone input level knob on the back. In addition to the fact that the Yeti X LED ring looks cooler, it gives you an additional balance control function, which the Yeti does not have.

Finally, the Yeti X gives you additional capabilities combined with Logitech G Hub desktop software. Using the G Hub, you can customize the colors of Yeti X LED rings and apply Blue VO! CE vocal effects, which are equalizer settings to process your voice with presets, including “Warm and Vintage”, “Parts and Modern “And” AM Radio “—or dial a number in your own settings.

Cool than similar Yeti and Yeti X?

Yeti X in front of Yeti and MacBook
The Yeti X adds a few small but noticeable improvements to the original, which is still capable. Marcus Rovita

Both microphones are powered by USB and can be disconnected from mounting bases on standard microphone stands or brackets. Separating the Yeti from the stand can send a few small washers, which are easily lost, in all directions, and these parts also make it difficult to attach the Yeti to the stand. Fortunately, the Yeti X design does not use any of these washers, so detaching and attaching it to the stand and off the stand provides a better experience.

Both microphones are also very sensitive to sound capture and have the same four capture patterns – internal settings that focus the audio recording of the microphone on specific areas in front, behind or around it. These four models are: cardioid (front), most common for a single person talking or singing; omnidirectional (360 degrees), best for representing the whole atmosphere of space; bidirectional (front and rear), ideal for two people sitting opposite each other; and a stereo that creates a wide sound image and is well suited for recording instruments or multiple sound sources in front of a microphone. The Yeti control template for selecting these pickup patterns (dial) is a bit difficult to switch, but the Yeti X uses the best push-button switch with LED icons to display the active pattern.

Once installed, the original Yeti has earned its esteemed reputation for combining clear, strong, detailed sound with rugged and durable metallic design and a professional look. It also has a headphone output that allows you to control the microphone input without delay while listening to audio from your computer – a great and very convenient feature. The Yeti X also has all of these features, with the aforementioned improved sound quality.

Is the Yeti X’s sound quality noticeably improved?

When comparing 16-bit / 48kHz recordings with Yeti with 24-bit / 48kHz recordings with Yeti X, there is a noticeable difference in the accuracy of Yeti vs. Yeti X. Yeti sounds a little harsher for “esses” and other consonant sounds as well as sounds breathing. The spoken words are clearer, and the musical instruments sound a little more textured and resonant on the Yeti X. Even when comparing the 16-bit / 48kHz recordings from both microphones, there was a smaller but still noticeable difference in clarity emanating from the Yeti X.

Note: If you want to get full audio separation from Yeti X, you may need to delve into the settings of recording software or streaming software to use 24-bit / 48 kHz resolution.

With all that said, unprepared listeners often don’t notice the difference between 16-bit audio and high resolution (above 16-bit). And millions of people listen to podcasts and live broadcasts every day in compressed audio formats such as MP3, and in this case, using a microphone with 24-bit or 16-bit audio will not matter.

If I just record myself in a conversation, why should I have a Yeti X?

Black Yeti X in a darkened room.
Yeti X LED lights can stand out live. Marcus Rovita

Although the practical need for 24-bit audio is not currently essential for many podcasters and streamers, the Yeti X still has an advantage in clarity over the Yeti because of its fourth capacitor. And if you start a podcast or other type of show in 2021, there is now a push to lossless audio in streaming services, so it may not hurt to “secure the future” of your setup in a way with a 24-bit audio USB microphone. which will remain relevant as sound quality expectations continue to grow over time. For example, 24-bit / 48 kHz audio (or higher) is already the preferred choice for recording music so that it can be delivered in high definition formats.

Aside from audio, the Yeti X may be more appealing to those who think about the look of their microphone on camera for their videos on YouTube, Instagram, TikTok and so on. Do you think the Yeti or Yeti X looks better – this is a subjective question, but having an LED level meter with customizable colors is certainly a way to stand out, and the Yeti X is at least much rarer (at the moment), while Blue claims millions of original Yeti are currently in use.

So is the original Yeti still good enough?

There are a lot of people who use Blue Microphones Yeti today for podcasts, Twitch streams, YouTube channels, etc., and their shows probably don’t suffer at all from using Yeti instead of Yeti X. So if you really want to save money or if you just prefer the silver or blue Yeti colors that are not available for the Yeti X, which just comes in black or white, you will get one of the best USB microphones for that money in the original Yeti.

On the other hand, you’ll also get a significant amount of improvements for the extra $ 60 for the Yeti X, which upgrades the Yeti in almost every way possible. The Yeti X offers clearer, richer sound from an optional capacitor capsule and digital audio separation, additional practical audio controls, a customizable multi-color ring for measuring LED levels, voice equalizer settings through software and a clearer design that offers more experience. microphone to stand.

Regardless of the model chosen, Blue Yeti against Yeti X The debate features USB microphones that have earned a reputation as the top two for their price. In the USB microphone market, the Yetis are strong in design but sound-sensitive, accurate, reliable and easy to use, plug-and-play options for PC-based broadcasting and smart devices.



Reported by Source link

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Most Popular